Dictionary.com

How did this new species of monkey get its name, and what does it mean?

Lesula, Cercopithecus lomamiensis, new monkeyYou may have read the news about the discovery of a new species of monkey in Africa, known as the Lesula, or Cercopithecus lomamiensis. The announcement of any new species is thrilling, and Lesula is only the second new primate species to be identified in the past 28 years. When something as rare and significant as this occurs, we immediately turn to where nature meets the dictionary: its name.

When an animal is verified by the scientific community as a new species, who decides its name? And what does the name mean?

You may recall from biology class that scientists use taxonomy, or a classification into categories, to organize all creatures big and small. The eight major tiered groupings are: life, domain, kingdom, phylum, class, order, family, genus, and species.

Species is the level that concerns us, so back to our monkey. When a biologist finds a creature that seems novel, he or she uses the eight categories above to start giving it an identity. Once the genus of an animal is settled, the tricky work of distinguishing one species from another begins. In the case of the Lesula, it is quite similar to a known primate, Cercopithecus Hamlyni, that lives in the neighboring region of the Congo. Cercopithecus is the genus for this subset of primates, and the naming of genera are governed by a set of rules called the Nomenclature Code. In this case, “cerco-“ is a Greek root meaning tailed, and “-pithecus” is Greek for monkey, thus the Ceropithecus is a tailed monkey.

The formal name of an undocumented species follows the rules of Binomial Nomenclature: you may recall from math class that binomial means two. The first part of a name is the genus, as we explained above. The second part is usually the privilege of the team of scientists who discovered the species. Can they name it anything? As long as the name can be treated like a Greek word, the rules are fairly open. Some people have named species after Bob Marley, Stephen Colbert, and many others. Usually, biologists try to have the name make sense. The “lomamiensis” in our new monkey’s name refers to the Lomami River, which flows through the Congo region where the species dwells. In the case of its relative, Cercopithecus Hamlyni, “Hamlyni” derives from the name of an animal trapper who introduced that primate to the scientific community.

You have noted that this entire time we have been referring to Cercopithecus lomamiensis as the “Lesula.” This is the name that local people call it. If that’s the case, why can’t the scientific name simply be “Lesula?” The answer is that science requires standardized rules and categories in order to make sense of the millions of species on our planet.

163 Comments

  1. Jules Debaer -  August 6, 2015 - 12:28 pm

    I like monkeys.

    Reply
  2. Nilam Love -  February 20, 2014 - 5:16 am

    He he ! Cool info about Monkey

    Reply
  3. Patel -  May 28, 2013 - 4:30 am

    Nice i m also like monkey … thanks informe me about monkey

    Reply
  4. Chetan -  May 25, 2013 - 9:05 am

    Nice things… Always respect animal because man kill animal but never animal kill man so always love animal… I love animal monkey.. :D :D

    Reply
  5. Mayur -  May 20, 2013 - 12:50 am

    In most of the cases the person, group or an institute ave rights to decide name of the animals. As you said, science requires a lots of rules to be followed to define good name of any new species.

    Reply
  6. Exam Result -  May 14, 2013 - 11:35 am

    Why TF does an African animal have a Greek name? :O :O :O note:- i am fan of monkey :)

    Reply
  7. Exam Result -  May 14, 2013 - 11:34 am

    I’m also a fan of Monkey and its mischievousness.

    Reply
  8. Exam Result -  May 6, 2013 - 11:15 am

    i think this monkey is very clever than other monkey… and it’s understand for all monkey fillings

    Reply
  9. vicky sadhu -  May 6, 2013 - 11:14 am

    Why TF does an African animal have a Greek name? :O :O :O note:- i am fan of monkey :)

    Reply
  10. Tancet -  April 24, 2013 - 11:43 am

    I’m also a fan of Monkey and its mischievousness.

    Reply
  11. Ricky Shah -  March 16, 2013 - 1:38 am

    I like all monkeys which is must be friendly and like all humans.

    Reply
  12. Sonali Shukla -  February 22, 2013 - 10:42 pm

    Comment about the “tailed monkey” moniker is funny, though. (“Crecopithecus” means tailed monkey, yet it seems that all monkeys have tails.)

    Reply
  13. Komalika Bhatt -  February 22, 2013 - 10:40 pm

    Those eyes…it looks pious.
    What’s with the “tailed monkey”? Aren’t all monkeys tailed??
    Anyways, Imma call it a “Holy Monkey”

    Reply
  14. Afaf Koradiya -  February 22, 2013 - 10:39 pm

    Yes~ the monkey DOES look pious! Exactly! It’s composed face, and eyes, make me think of paintings of the saints! lol that’s funn

    Reply
  15. Piludiya Az -  February 22, 2013 - 10:37 pm

    Lesula is the name that the locals called it. That makes it the monkey’s “common name.”
    Cercopithecus lomamiensis is the monkey’s scientific name.

    Reply
  16. Sifet Thasariya -  February 22, 2013 - 10:36 pm

    I like this monkey, his eyes are very fine…

    Reply
  17. Pathan Jayesh -  February 22, 2013 - 10:35 pm

    Two Best Advices For Safe Life :
    .
    .
    .
    1. Always Speak The Truth, No Matter How Bitter Harsh It Is ..
    .
    .
    .
    .
    2. Run Immediately After Saying It..:)

    Reply
  18. My IPL Blog -  February 22, 2013 - 10:20 pm

    i think this monkey is very clever than other monkey… and it’s understand for all monkey fillings

    Reply
  19. mespringer2001 -  November 13, 2012 - 9:06 pm

    to thisis0b: Yes~ the monkey DOES look pious! Exactly! It’s composed face, and eyes, make me think of paintings of the saints! lol that’s funny – Holy Monkey!

    Reply
  20. thisis0b -  November 5, 2012 - 5:44 pm

    Those eyes…it looks pious.

    What’s with the “tailed monkey”? Aren’t all monkeys tailed??
    Anyways, Imma call it a “Holy Monkey”

    Reply
  21. vipul -  November 1, 2012 - 9:41 am

    i think this monkey is very clever than other monkey… and it’s understand for all monkey fillings :)

    Reply
  22. Mayblues5 -  October 29, 2012 - 1:34 am

    I love monkeys…

    Reply
  23. DD -  October 23, 2012 - 2:29 pm

    @TW (et al.) “Discovery” to the general scientific community has always meant “discovery by someone who then communicates the discovery to the general scientific community”. Otherwise it just doesn’t count. It has always been that way. Occasionally you do get an overturn of attribution with respect to discoverers and inventors, but usually the one with the biggest backers and widest news coverage is the winner. I’m guessing this will not change in the near future.

    Comment about the “tailed monkey” moniker is funny, though. (“Crecopithecus” means tailed monkey, yet it seems that all monkeys have tails.) Could the Crecopithecus have been named sarcastically? Scientists have been known to have a sense of humor from time to time. Or possibly the tails of nearby sub-species have tails so short as to be nearly unnoticeable.

    Reply
  24. carlos -  October 3, 2012 - 2:47 pm

    “Me Gusta”

    Reply
  25. Full Of Entertainment -  October 1, 2012 - 10:47 am

    Two Best Advices For Safe Life :
    .
    .
    .
    1. Always Speak The Truth, No Matter How Bitter Harsh It Is ..
    .
    .
    .
    .
    2. Run Immediately After Saying It..:)

    Reply
  26. AWAD/RANDOM | BLOGCHI@mayopia.com -  September 21, 2012 - 9:39 am

    [...] ‘Marmoreal’ to surroundings — ‘Tenuous’ with any relief. — Monkeys in charge of the Monkey House — A ‘Hiemal’ institution Raising money as a core [...]

    Reply
  27. LOOK-UP | BLOGCHI@mayopia.com -  September 20, 2012 - 3:03 pm

    [...] enure/inure of wordy Wanderlust. – A simple treat or libation or caudle, — Not another Monkey; — We have no time to Dawdle. — It could be a Bird or a Plane or another Falling Star  [...]

    Reply
  28. MONKEY | BLOGCHI@mayopia.com -  September 20, 2012 - 1:52 pm

    [...] ‘Monkey’ feel the Dew as some do do the ‘taxonomy’ of everything. — Surely confused by ‘phylum’ though the genus is confusing to us — And another dangling String. — The Congo in isolation or another ‘Monkey’ on the back from too much black China Tea. — Call it language or Nomenclature: Lesula; Cercopithecus; lomamiensis — It all Seems Too Strange too, Oui, believe. — Binomial Nomenclature withstanding, — How many have they whatever found? — Is the Lesula Picture that of a boy or girl or both — Mayhap, Circling around. — We’re too crowded to do more research: Our Monkey is the Doggerel — Not too mention self-reflection and identity protection. — We congratulate the New Monkey’s inaugural. — That is if it really is new — And not another actor in disguise. — What’s another monkey to do? — Don’t ask us no questions and we won’t tell no Politically Correct — Oxymoron Lies. –>>L.T.Rhyme [...]

    Reply
  29. paul -  September 20, 2012 - 12:07 am

    will they still have the same name when they are out of the euro.?

    Reply
  30. TML -  September 19, 2012 - 5:11 pm

    @goodwin
    Lesula is the name that the locals called it. That makes it the monkey’s “common name.”
    Cercopithecus lomamiensis is the monkey’s scientific name.

    Reply
  31. Anonymous -  September 19, 2012 - 2:26 pm

    I’ve read this and its quit fascinating. I looked at the comments to see what interesting thoughts some other people might have on this… most people wrote about this… but i found it quit disturbing that just because someone said “spelt” it caused a whole commotion! I was astonished. I’m sad to say that’s acting like four year old. Its a word “spelt” its a simple past tense and past particle of spell! Theres not much more to it. We dont need to make a little quarrel about this do we? I laughed when I saw this because I remember when I used to act like that. Its very childish. The comments are suppose to be about this fascinating creature, not about what you people think about “spelt.”

    Reply
  32. T-shritwetter -  September 19, 2012 - 1:14 pm

    agreeing w/ Anna Perenna… I feel it’s name should have been “Cercopithecus Lesula” considering the locals knew of its existence. People kill me with “descovering” something that has been around and known for centuries.. Two thumbs down for the scientists who “descovered” this creature.

    Reply
  33. Karenina -  September 19, 2012 - 10:43 am

    Fascinating. So there are still things “new under the sun”! This Lesula monkey picture reminds me of a baroque painting by some old master like Johannes Vermeer, where the lighting, look and shadows are so important and captivating. I bet the local Congo people, who have known about this monkey for generations, are equally fascinated by the scientific people who have found this “new discovery”!

    Reply
  34. johnathan heard -  September 19, 2012 - 8:31 am

    cool monkey i wanna touch the new species and see is it friendly.!!!!!!

    Reply
  35. Anna Perenna -  September 19, 2012 - 7:56 am

    This article should be called “white slowpoke discovers monkey which Africans have known for millenia”.
    At least it has the name of the local Lomami river included… but why not include Lesula there as well?
    Lesula is what the monkey will be called for short anyway, everywhere outside scientific papers.

    Reply
  36. Tobi Odakoe -  September 19, 2012 - 7:51 am

    WOW! What an amazing monkey..!

    Reply
  37. Yvonne -  September 19, 2012 - 7:42 am

    Weird and confusing but THATS ALL RIGHT…

    Reply
  38. hi -  September 19, 2012 - 7:35 am

    Why do you people fight over something this insignificant? Please let me remind you that rare animals tend to disappear in no time thanks to our “care” for nature. Instead of fighting over such trivial stuff you could spend your precious free time fighting about Justin Bieber’s new haircut and spit on science since it does not approve of God.

    Reply
  39. Ravindra U Rao -  September 19, 2012 - 5:02 am

    How does the monkey become ‘newly discovered’ if the local people have known about it for a long time?

    Reply
  40. Chris -  September 19, 2012 - 1:32 am

    Nice article. For anyone still interested, the genus in a Latin binomial should be capitalised, the species (second word in the binomial) should not. So, where the article says that the new discovery’s ‘sister’ species is called “Cercopithecus Hamlyni”, it should really say “Cercopithecus hamlyni”. There ya go… just an observation of a bored pedant.

    Reply
  41. Chris K. -  September 18, 2012 - 9:48 pm

    Is it just me, or did anyone else think the name “Cercopithecus” was pretty stupid? I mean the scientists do realize that EVERY monkey has a tail, right? I mean thats the primary thing that seperates monkeys from apes. Monkeys have tails, apes do not. So what ediot decided to give the MONKEY the name of “he TAILED monkey?” Moron!

    Reply
  42. aj -  September 18, 2012 - 7:07 pm

    I think the monkey is very human like.

    Reply
  43. Dr Ron Grassi -  September 18, 2012 - 6:17 pm

    Man. He looks so sad that he was discovered. Should have just left him alone !

    Reply
  44. J`Teime -  September 18, 2012 - 5:53 pm

    THIS THINGS FREAKS ME OUT!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    Reply
  45. Ano Onomous -  September 18, 2012 - 5:02 pm

    Actually the convention of using Greek and Latin roots and stems to name plants and animals is no longer officially required. Technically you can name it anything, not changing the already established names for its classification of course. But as for the species name, it could have been named anything. However since most people are taught Greek and Latin stems regaurdless of their language it really is suitable to name creatures based off of this easily understandable nominclature.

    Reply
  46. krishnamurthy, v -  September 18, 2012 - 2:52 pm

    Simply great! so much nearly human, specially eyes, expressive, divine, like a sage – not like a monkey at all in the sense tricky-ish !! Perhaps most evolved of all monkeys, just below human being!!!

    Reply
  47. anne -  September 18, 2012 - 2:40 pm

    omg it looks like my sister! :P

    Reply
  48. CappinKickAZZ -  September 18, 2012 - 1:41 pm

    IT LOOKS REALLY BORED!!!

    Reply
  49. mariah -  September 18, 2012 - 1:23 pm

    it looks lik a person to me

    Reply
  50. Go_Go -  September 18, 2012 - 11:30 am

    I Agree with C_J_B95 on the correcting part!:) And I also Love Monkeys:)

    Reply
  51. C_J_B95 -  September 18, 2012 - 11:29 am

    You guys for a slight second stopped talking about the monkey and started talking about correcting eachother lol But this new Monkey is Awesome I love Monkeys Alot. Reminds me of My Gf and Her Eyes:)
    Love to all the Monkey Lover:)

    Reply
  52. Yankiemog -  September 18, 2012 - 10:29 am

    Although the words are allied to Greek all species are described in Latin

    Reply
  53. Patrick Oliver -  September 18, 2012 - 9:26 am

    I must ask.
    What is the difference between a tailed monkey and any other monkey?
    Still, cool name.

    Reply
  54. Mango464 -  September 18, 2012 - 8:01 am

    Hehe that monkey reminds my of my cousin. Alien looking and DISTURBING!

    Reply
  55. CoconutHead -  September 18, 2012 - 7:59 am

    That’s the most disturbing monkey I have ever seen.

    Reply
  56. Domo_very important -  September 18, 2012 - 7:40 am

    :D lol, the monkey is… amazing and creepy at the same time…

    Reply
  57. Gary Hall -  September 18, 2012 - 7:27 am

    – The Greeks were one of the early manipulaters of earth’s goings, implementing A plethora of mythological crap /n/ fallacious ideas — while some contemporaneous scientist adhere to /n/ prolong such/!!!!/

    Reply
  58. SeaDragon -  September 18, 2012 - 6:18 am

    Now I know why we have dropped so far in the world in science. ALMOST ALL of the questions in the comments were answered in the article! C’mon folks READ IT BEFORE commenting.

    Ok, I am now off my soap-box.

    Reply
  59. Danii5432 -  September 18, 2012 - 6:05 am

    How does the monkey look like anyone? It just looks like a human with ALOT of hair, like my sister… And a tail.

    Reply
  60. didiza -  September 18, 2012 - 1:05 am

    lucky are those belong to Greek and Latin Scientific institution cz they get a chance to name any kind of species world wide

    Reply
  61. maureen -  September 18, 2012 - 12:27 am

    hahaha!kwani all monkeys originate from Africa.

    Reply
  62. TRON -  September 17, 2012 - 10:14 pm

    wow where bout in africa :0

    Reply
  63. Steven -  September 17, 2012 - 5:48 pm

    The latter, longer-phrased phonetically lengthy, two-word identification is of course the scientific name for those who’ve asked, lol. Certainly mesmerizing…for me, galvanizes rumination over extra terrestrial aliens. Perhaps metalloid, asexual/self-proliferated aliens? Who knows..

    Reply
  64. Jim -  September 17, 2012 - 5:43 pm

    Crecopithecus or “Lesula” is definately genetically modified by scientists; just like what they are trying to do with our foods. Who ever heard of a monkey with straight nose and thin lips. If you expect me to believe that, I can sell you the Brooklyn Bridge.

    Reply
  65. Kristy -  September 17, 2012 - 5:24 pm

    cute monkey!

    Reply
  66. Primateluuuuuver -  September 17, 2012 - 4:44 pm

    I love primates…all of them! This is exciting news!!!

    Reply
  67. kiwinz -  September 17, 2012 - 4:37 pm

    interesting…

    Reply
  68. Gracie -  September 17, 2012 - 4:32 pm

    kids these days i will make that into a foot lotion

    Reply
  69. Gracie -  September 17, 2012 - 4:31 pm

    this is a wierd name for a monkey but interesting i need to resesrch this i am a scientist

    Reply
  70. Zayn Malik -  September 17, 2012 - 3:53 pm

    WOW! instead of signing contracts and having a world tour this article is interesting and take it from a guy that not a reading-person….@ paul that whole paragraph answered my question

    Reply
  71. Guest -  September 17, 2012 - 3:46 pm

    @mastertherion

    This article was going so well, some persons may have had differing opinions which could be appreciated, that was until your comment. In short, you need Jesus! & it would be obvious if you do not believe in the Master, why you would be gay! therefore, you would not believe in procreation either!

    Reply
  72. Dasia -  September 17, 2012 - 1:56 pm

    I love dictionary.com but the people who write it make it hard to remeber and uses to many big words. I love the article but it would have been more interesting with adjectives!

    Reply
  73. Anonymous -  September 17, 2012 - 1:51 pm

    It doesn’t have a Greek name, it just has Greek roots. There are many types of species that have Greek roots in their names.

    Reply
  74. Lyric McLaughlin -  September 17, 2012 - 1:47 pm

    The monkey doesnt even look new but it haves featurs of a baboon. I think it can be related to the baboon. We may never know.

    Reply
  75. why should you care -  September 17, 2012 - 1:27 pm

    You know, the monkey looks like a minecraft villager!

    Reply
  76. Malik -  September 17, 2012 - 1:12 pm

    Looks like an intelligent monkey…ask it’s name instead!

    Reply
  77. hshaheen -  September 17, 2012 - 12:48 pm

    Why the new name, Discovered ?? This is like me discovering your children in your house and calling them my own names. This monkey is very well. known in its region, the locals have a name for it for 1000 years or more we should have just used that.

    Reply
  78. CMW -  September 17, 2012 - 12:15 pm

    Spelt is correct if you are from the UK. We have a grand and glorious English language — many-faceted. And spelt is as correct as spelled.

    Reply
  79. Me -  September 17, 2012 - 12:11 pm

    Interesting how this “discovery” was already well-known to the locals….Kind of like Columbus “discovering” an inhabited land.

    Reply
  80. Svenjamin -  September 17, 2012 - 12:00 pm

    I wish there were just a little explaination of whay this monkey is able to be classified as a separate species. Left hanging a bit…

    Reply
  81. Charles C. Bagai -  September 17, 2012 - 11:43 am

    Well I’ll be a monkey’s uncle!

    Reply
  82. Jenia Silver -  September 17, 2012 - 9:53 am

    Wow! I am taken into a memory about a movie at watched from my local library collection nmaed ” A Passage to India” and there is a cult like pressence of a monkey creature following the main character of this movie, she is also a victim to some strange type of affliction, whew..this is odd and breathe taking…I wonder how this species had hidden itself for so long?

    Reply
  83. Giratina -  September 17, 2012 - 9:34 am

    Who ever said it was a girl Mark..

    Reply
  84. Manray130 -  September 17, 2012 - 8:53 am

    Kids these days…

    Reply
  85. Domo_very important -  September 17, 2012 - 7:36 am

    Ms Dani Mack it has a greek name because the person who discovered it was either racist or hates Africa!!!!

    Reply
  86. Lolcatz -  September 17, 2012 - 7:23 am

    Nice monkey, i really thought it was interesting. :D but, its really creepy…….. wait till it EVOLVES (please don’t reply if i spelled anything wrong…. XD)

    Reply
  87. CynMo -  September 17, 2012 - 6:41 am

    Thoroughly enjoyed this article. Thanks!

    Reply
  88. Robert Vaughn -  September 17, 2012 - 6:04 am

    its so human……

    Reply
  89. Kichhy -  September 17, 2012 - 5:14 am

    Lovely

    Reply
  90. Joe -  September 17, 2012 - 3:46 am

    It looks like Dominic Chianese. (the actor who plays Uncle Junior in the Sopranos).

    Reply
  91. Mimido -  September 17, 2012 - 2:14 am

    JJ..perhaps you need to upgrade your vocabulary especially when the task isn’t far reaching.

    spelt
    1    [spelt] Show IPA

    verb
    a simple past tense and past participle of spell.

    Spelt is one of those ambiguous words (or what is the same word with different meanings called?)

    Reply
  92. Yankiemog -  September 17, 2012 - 1:10 am

    Everything works fine in nature until human beings come on the scene

    Reply
  93. Yankiemog -  September 17, 2012 - 1:08 am

    Objectionabulis destructivis otherwise known as Human Being.

    Reply
  94. mastertherion -  September 16, 2012 - 9:16 pm

    in response to the comment about a news species being made by genetic/cloning experiments, how do you think our entire human race was made and appeared on this planet? Aliens doing the same kind of engineering with their own DNA and monkeys themselves to create useful creatures is exactly how the human race began! id say this may be alarming to those who would not like to believe it, but regardless, any species of primates that happens to be scientifically modified by other species does not preclude the need to have a name and scientific classification for it. As much as i don’t like being labelled a homo.. lol :)

    Reply
  95. Andy -  September 16, 2012 - 7:49 pm

    The bi-nomial method developed by C. Linneaus is the standard way of naming organisms: Genus & species, written in Italics and underlined. Though the name should refer to distinct traits, locality, etc, of the organism, many foolish mistakes and misnomers occur; some unintended.

    Reply
  96. XXX -  September 16, 2012 - 7:40 pm

    Carrissa, on September 14, 2012 at 2:51 pm, wrote:

    “Cercopithecus lomamiensis is the scientific name for what the local people call them “Lesula”. It has to have a greek name because that’s what scientists use for classification language. That’s why an african animal has a greek name.”

    Carrissa’s comment touches on a reasonable idea. But I think she had an unexpanded idea. – An Africa creature is given a Greek name just because standardized nomenclature must be followed. Couldn’t the place of origin of an animal like this be reflected in the name of the animal as a standard naming rule? If the new species had HIV, then the name ‘Africa’ will be sounded a million times in the literature! It is all about the negative branding of the “dark continent”. Nothing good goes with the name. Glorify the Greek name instead! Sense and simplicity of manipulating the world!

    Reply
  97. Shae -  September 16, 2012 - 5:56 pm

    I was also curious about the name Lesula. An above comment asked this question and the following comment said, “…innocent eyes”. Was that the meaning of the name Lesula or just someone’s comment about the monkey? Anyone know?

    Reply
  98. Giftie -  September 16, 2012 - 5:27 pm

    This monkey actully has a blue rear hind

    Reply
  99. fred -  September 16, 2012 - 5:20 pm

    COOL i want one now…

    Reply
  100. Ezekiel -  September 16, 2012 - 2:47 pm

    Crazy that they’re discovering new species of monkey!

    Reply
  101. ana -  September 16, 2012 - 2:42 pm

    I just hope the Scientist don’t start doing test on the
    poor monkeys cause they are going to destroy the new species

    Reply
  102. flying turtles -  September 16, 2012 - 1:27 pm

    this monkey is ver human like it so awsome!!!!!!!!!!!!

    Reply
  103. Casual Observer -  September 16, 2012 - 10:40 am

    This article is an interesting read however I find it curious that a new monkey was discovered when the locals have known about it likely a long while. Why is it a new discovery now? Properly titled this article should read “New species of monkey identified by the scientific community”. Oh well semantics I guess..
    Here is the very first sentence of the article that clearly claims the discovery of a new monkey:

    You may have read the news about the discovery of a new species of monkey in Africa, known as the Lesula, or Cercopithecus lomamiensis.

    Reply
  104. KK -  September 16, 2012 - 10:28 am

    they tell not to post so fast and I not got one post dere…or here.

    Reply
  105. Kevin -  September 16, 2012 - 10:12 am

    So the information one gets is only as useful as the credibility of its source. Looking at how many people screwed up information that was given and criticized obvious typos, not to mention cast doubt on the ability of the writer of this story to get his facts straight about the languages used to name flora and fauna, it is a wonder that anyone anywhere can agree to anything between folks. The monkey looks wiser than some people…that was a personal observation not a cheapo.

    Reply
  106. jayaraj -  September 16, 2012 - 8:33 am

    rekindled my college days. prof.Raghunatha Rao, Dr.Murthy stalwarts at Loyola Chennai.

    But some thing more technical would have done a little bit more to us. Like how it is identified as a separate species. What standards apply to consider change of species.
    For example when culturing paddy to arrive at better one they cultivate pure breeds inter pollinate, separate again breed and finally arrive at the desired characters. Yet they do not give a new species name. It is only called a variety. So to nominate a new species there must be some thing more needed. What is it.

    Reply
  107. Mehool -  September 16, 2012 - 8:13 am

    We are talking about monkey here.
    What’s up with spelt v/s Spelled ?
    Anyway this is the dictionary website !

    Reply
  108. Tony -  September 16, 2012 - 6:58 am

    @jj
    Dictionary.com says:
    spelt
    1    [spelt]
    verb
    a simple past tense and past participle of spell.

    Example Sentences
    The final communiqué spelt out a package that did rather more than had been expected.

    http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/spelt?s=t

    Reply
  109. Amin -  September 16, 2012 - 5:13 am

    Some people incorrectly use specie!!! Species is both singular and plural, as can be seen from the text! By the way, intriguing species!!!

    Reply
  110. Blossom -  September 16, 2012 - 3:46 am

    Cute though wise too but still got the freaky side

    Reply
  111. Blossom -  September 16, 2012 - 3:44 am

    Cute though

    Reply
  112. Blossom -  September 16, 2012 - 3:42 am

    Quit with the spelling thing…by the way the monkey kinda freaks me out

    Reply
  113. peace and tranquility -  September 16, 2012 - 2:43 am

    An overflow of information for me! Cool!

    Reply
  114. hiyakaya -  September 16, 2012 - 2:40 am

    very interesting…

    Reply
  115. Ibekwe Iheanyi Innocent -  September 16, 2012 - 2:02 am

    Wow! What a wonderful discovery: this human like specie monkey could have human attributes. It is a great achievement.

    Reply
  116. Big D NZ -  September 15, 2012 - 10:58 pm

    This has got to be one of the most dignified monkeys I have ever seen, anywhere, ever! I could totally hang with this dude and discuss Plato, or whatever else it’s scheming little mind was pondering over to start the revolution which will enable it’s kind to retake the planet from us destructive hominids.

    Reply
  117. Diane -  September 15, 2012 - 9:59 pm

    I thought that ALL MONKEYS have tails, but APES do not- chimpanzees, gorillas, orangutans….silly fact I remember, or am I wrong?

    Reply
  118. someone -  September 15, 2012 - 8:26 pm

    awww…….innocent eyes

    Reply
  119. Nobody -  September 15, 2012 - 4:45 pm

    Also, I would have liked an explanation of where “lasula” came from.

    Reply
  120. Nobody -  September 15, 2012 - 4:43 pm

    A good example of why scientific names are necessary is the Puma concolor. In different parts of the US, it is known as a puma, a cougar, and a mountain lion.

    Reply
  121. TW -  September 15, 2012 - 3:34 pm

    What constitutes a “discovery”? Is it that no one knew about the monkey until now, or the “right people” didn’t know about the monkey until now? If the latter, it’s appalling that we still have a colonialism mindset as it pertains to “discovery.”

    Reply
  122. LOL! -  September 15, 2012 - 2:45 pm

    da cool munkey

    Reply
  123. Sam -  September 15, 2012 - 2:45 pm

    that was confusing

    the monkey looks odd or weird like my cousin Max

    Reply
  124. lol -  September 15, 2012 - 2:45 pm

    cool!

    Reply
  125. Zeze -  September 15, 2012 - 1:51 pm

    cool name, though

    Reply
  126. Zeze -  September 15, 2012 - 1:50 pm

    the face is kinda creepy. . .

    Reply
  127. Kaylie -  September 15, 2012 - 1:48 pm

    this monkey is very cool looking and the name suits it well

    Reply
  128. Olivia -  September 15, 2012 - 1:22 pm

    anyone else think the monkeys kinda creepy? cute too though…

    Reply
  129. Dee -  September 15, 2012 - 1:15 pm

    This article only has six short paragraphs. It won’t even take you five minutes to read. So, I don’t think we need a “shortened overview.”

    Reply
  130. Kristin Thomsen -  September 15, 2012 - 12:43 pm

    I thought the monkey looks like Gene Wilder. Of course, I have no idea what Nell’s nephew, Brian, looks like to say whom it favors the most. I do agree about the noble features on its face. (not knowing if the animal pictured is male or female I used the pronoun its)

    Reply
  131. SunDragon -  September 15, 2012 - 10:33 am

    Very human-like eyes. Even the nose looks more human than most monkeys. It looks kind of sad and shy though. I suppose it wouldn’t be used to the human attention. haha

    Reply
  132. Jinx -  September 15, 2012 - 9:52 am

    Actually, “spelt” is a perfectly acceptable form of “spelled”. English has many variants outside the US which are perfectly suitable/correct and as we’re on the Internet, it pays to keep that in mind before chastising.

    Reply
  133. Takeharu Kirijo -  September 15, 2012 - 9:34 am

    @JJ:
    Spelt is correct if you live in the UK.

    Reply
  134. claire -  September 15, 2012 - 8:36 am

    this is sorta interesting, but i wish there was a shortened overview for people who dont want to read the whole article

    Reply
  135. luvmonkey -  September 15, 2012 - 8:16 am

    I like the idea that a scientist in one part of the world could be researching an animal or plant, then go to another part of the world and the scientific name would be the same. Can you imagine how long research would take otherwise? Monkey looks depressed as heck btw. Maybe it’s the lighting.

    Reply
  136. NAVPREET SINGH -  September 15, 2012 - 5:00 am

    The creation has no limits, it is priceless , speechless beauty and cant’ be quantify, never can be written in words. This new species or fellow members seems to be having more intrinsic qualities and sense of nature than human beings.

    Reply
  137. pk surendran -  September 15, 2012 - 4:17 am

    Nell, it is not your nephew alone, it resembles to a lot many we meet, and startingly close to three of my cousins

    Reply
  138. Mark -  September 15, 2012 - 1:58 am

    Kinda look like ryan

    Reply
  139. Arfan Maulana -  September 15, 2012 - 1:32 am

    He looks like an evolution of monkeys. Perhaps he is… Hopefully not

    Reply
  140. Stephanie -  September 14, 2012 - 11:40 pm

    everyone on here seems to want to sound so smart but all of you just sound like idiots…some of the things that some of you say are valid, but, for the most part, it comes across that you couldn’t pass high school English and have only ever learned science from Wikipedia. Do everyone a favor and STFU

    Reply
  141. C.M. -  September 14, 2012 - 9:06 pm

    This monkey is very suspicious… I think it is a result of people mixing genetics and trying to introduce something as “new discovery” because you don’t want the masses to know the truth about how the governments are allowing testing and cloning. To bring such a thing out like this in this day and age definitely would have to be a genetically altered being… human with monkey. Soon we might see it begin to talk or something… yall better quit messing witih nature!!!

    Reply
  142. Interesting -  September 14, 2012 - 8:52 pm

    Monkeys are awesome and all but am I the only one who thinks this new monkey looks incredibly creepy? The photo looking straight at it’s face, it creeps me out.

    Reply
  143. Thomas Mendrala -  September 14, 2012 - 7:52 pm

    cerco and pithecus indeed have Greek etymology; but the rules of binomial nomenclature require the name to use LATIN grammatical forms – to be treated like a Latin word. This article mistakenly says “like a Greek word”

    Reply
  144. John Elijah VII -  September 14, 2012 - 7:47 pm

    hmmmm…guyz…don’t forget the RISE of the Planet of the Apes movie….

    Reply
  145. jj -  September 14, 2012 - 7:27 pm

    Yes, she looks like a person to me. A look of knowing, wisdom.

    And Earthling123, they may have spelled Cercopithecus wrong, but you spelled “spelt” wrong. Spelt is a form of wheat used in breads and tortillas, it is not the word used to spell other words in the past tense. The correct word is “spelled”. We would not have been allowed to graduate from school if we spelled that way……

    Reply
  146. Jim Miller -  September 14, 2012 - 6:51 pm

    They’re also very delicious stir fried.

    Reply
  147. F1RN -  September 14, 2012 - 6:49 pm

    Evolution…blink, and you just might miss it.

    Reply
  148. Paul -  September 14, 2012 - 5:04 pm

    @goodwin:
    The monkey was given a Greek (or Latin) name because that’s the worldwide standard that has persisted for hundreds of years. Admittedly, it’s a Eurocentric perspective. But it’s a useful method for referring to plants and animals, especially those whose habitats span regions of multiple human languages (and, therefore, species who have many differing names in the various local dialects.) Furthermore, during the colonial era, Europeans from various countries sailed the world encountering new species. They attempted to categorize and organize them systematically. Some of the European adventurers spoke English, some spoke Spanish, some Portuguese, some German, some French, and others spoke Italian. But, in that era, all of the highly educated Europeans shared one thing in common: a working knowledge of Latin and Greek. Latin and Greek were the languages held in common by all of the European scientists. That’s why they chose to use Latin or Greek for names of the Genus and species of newly discovered animals.
    One of the primary leaders of this system of naming was Swedish scientist Carl Linneaus (1708-1778.) His book, “Systema Naturae”, published in 1735) established the system of using Greek (or Latin) names for scientific names of plants and animals. Later refinements by scientists in subsequent decades established the usage of the concepts of “genus and species” and continued to use Greek (or Latin) to unambiguously refer to an animal, regardless of what it was called in its local habitat.

    Reply
  149. Jaswinder Sandhu -  September 14, 2012 - 4:26 pm

    The name Cercopithecus lomamiensis makes sense, but I’d have preferred Cercopithecus lasulas lomamiensis. This name would have given the community (who knew it from long time) its share of privelege and pride. It would have also stimulated them to participate in this rare species’ conservation.

    Reply
  150. Isabella -  September 14, 2012 - 2:55 pm

    Cercopithecus lomamiensis is the scientific word

    Reply
  151. Carrissa -  September 14, 2012 - 2:55 pm

    Also to further into why an African animal has a Greek name is because of what they said in the article, and I quote “Cercopithecus is the genus for this subset of primates, and the naming of genera are governed by a set of rules called the Nomenclature Code. In this case, “cerco-“ is a Greek root meaning tailed, and “-pithecus” is Greek for monkey, thus the Ceropithecus is a tailed monkey.”

    Reply
  152. Mike -  September 14, 2012 - 2:52 pm

    Makes sense to name an animal that references it’s habitat. As far as the why TF comment–all references to animal species are in Greek/Latin so all nations and peoples can identify them as the same species. Ex. a house sparrow is the same species in all nations but the name will change in differing languages. Makes us all equal…

    Reply
  153. Carrissa -  September 14, 2012 - 2:51 pm

    Cercopithecus lomamiensis is the scientific name for what the local people call them “Lesula”. It has to have a greek name because that’s what scientists use for classification language. That’s why an african animal has a greek name.

    Reply
  154. Mark -  September 14, 2012 - 2:12 pm

    She’s so cool when is she coming to the zoo like you guys did with the other rare animals. You guys are soooooo cruel to animals.

    Reply
  155. Cayo -  September 14, 2012 - 1:43 pm

    wow, this thing looks very human. those eyes….

    Reply
  156. Cyberquill -  September 14, 2012 - 1:32 pm

    Why make up a name? Why not simply ask the monkey?

    Reply
  157. Earthling123 -  September 14, 2012 - 1:28 pm

    4th paragraph, last line: “In this case, ‘cerco-’ is a Greek root meaning tailed, and ‘-pithecus’ is Greek for monkey, thus the Ceropithecus is a tailed monkey.”

    This blog has actually spelt ‘Cercopithecus’ wrong. Missed the C.

    Overall, this is really interesting.

    Reply
  158. goodwin -  September 14, 2012 - 12:49 pm

    I am confused. Is Lesula Monkey’s scientific name, or is the “Cercopithecus lomamiensis” the scientific name?

    Reply
  159. Ms Dani Mack -  September 14, 2012 - 12:31 pm

    Why TF does an African animal have a Greek name?

    Reply
  160. Nell Tarbania -  September 14, 2012 - 11:54 am

    interesting. this new monkey specie resembles my nephew Brian, nobel eyes.

    Reply

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