Dictionary.com

Martin Luther King Jr’s Original Name

Martin Luther King Jr

Michael King Jr. was born on January 15, 1929, in Atlanta, Georgia. You read that correctly ― Martin Luther King Jr. was originally named after his father, Michael King Sr. Six years later, the Reverend Martin Luther King Sr., inspired by the 16th-century Augustinian monk and theologian, Martin Luther, proclaimed to his congregation that from that point forward they were to refer to him as Martin Luther King and to his son as Martin Luther King Jr. Although MLK Jr. never legally changed his name, it is this revised appellation that is carved into historical memory. Let’s look at the particulars of the Civil Rights leader’s name and see what we find.

The name Martin is of Latin origin stemming from the name Martius, a late derived form of the Roman god of fertility and war, Mars. Mars was the most prominent of various war-related gods in the Roman pantheon. The month of March and the Red Planet are his namesake. Another notable Martin is Saint Martin of Tour, a 4th-century bishop who, according to legend, ripped his cloak in two and gave half of it to a beggar he saw in the middle of winter; he later became the patron saint of France. The name Martin was also borne by five popes.

Luther is of German and Hebrew origin combining luit, which means “people,” and heri, which means “army” or “warrior.” The name’s Biblical usage suggests that Luther derived from strong Hebrew influence. The Lutheran church, a branch of Western Christianity, was named after the German reformer Martin Luther, whose translation of the Bible from Latin into German not only was a huge factor in the Protestant Reformation but also influenced the evolution of the modern German language.

The name King is of English, Scottish, and Irish origin. It derives from the Old English cyning, “tribal leader,” and the Gaelic ceann, “head” or “leader.” Throughout the Middle Ages, the name King was used to refer to someone who conducted himself in a kingly manner or one who attended to the king.

Junior, or the abbreviated Jr., stems from the Latin juvenis, “young man, youth.” Beginning in the late 1700s, the meaning of the word evolved from “of lesser standing, more recent” to “younger people, of smaller size.”

Do you think the historical meanings of MLK Jr.’s name reflect his qualities and accomplishments? Share your thoughts.

70 Comments

  1. bill -  January 21, 2012 - 5:13 pm

    i think it represents how he had the spirit of a warrior and how he apposed war

    Reply
  2. Kat Slatery -  January 15, 2012 - 1:11 pm

    I forgot to put the website down.

    Reply
  3. Kat Slatery -  January 15, 2012 - 1:09 pm

    Marin Luther King Jr. plagiarized most of his work; although it was not found out until after his death so he was never punished. Most people don’t know this so he is considered a great man. He did fight for freedom; however, he should not be credited for being such a great academic success.

    Reply
  4. emily -  January 27, 2011 - 4:49 pm

    There was a martin luther during Queen mary’s rule. He was this guy that did not approve of people sinning and then paying a preist. then the preist would tell them that their sinns were forgiven. Martin Luther did not approve. REMEMBER TO CLICK ON MY NAME AND VISIT MY RELATIVE’S WEBSITE AND BUY SOME SWEETS!!!!

    Reply
  5. Q4Wla -  January 22, 2011 - 10:25 pm

    Wowwww, from all your comments, I’ve learnt A LOT!!!! Heard of MLK Jr. but never actually read anything about him before. It’s the first time I’ve read a piece of story plus comments about him. Interesting pieces of information.

    Reply
  6. Shannyn -  January 17, 2011 - 4:20 pm

    Interesting article.

    What frustrates me is that it seems that everyone still thinks, “wow, he has done SO well for a black man”, as opposed to, “wow, he has done SO well” in general.

    Reply
  7. peter Madol -  January 17, 2011 - 1:53 pm

    I think yes, the name reflected indeed to Martin leadership.

    Reply
  8. Sekou -  January 17, 2011 - 1:25 pm

    Love404 on January 16, 2011 at 11:15 am states that:

    “This isn’t true at ALL! I took a course, taught by MLK’s sister, and she said it wasn’t true! She told us the author of one the books about MLK, assumed this. Another student almost got her feelings hurt for trying to give is this same info!

    Visit the MLK birth home in ATL and they will give you the real story behind his name change.”

    What’s not true, that he did not change his name or he did change his name, but the rationale behind why he change his name is erroneous? Please advise.

    Reply
  9. makseph -  January 17, 2011 - 1:15 pm

    MARTIN == THE FIGHT, A WAR,
    LUTHER == THE PEOPLE
    KING == LEADER
    JR =” juvenis” YOUNG MAN

    Indeed there is something significant about his name.

    He lead an army of people and fought a peaceful fight, for the sake of the young generation!

    Reply
  10. Mary Margaret -  January 17, 2011 - 12:11 pm

    I didn’t know that Martin Luther King Jr. took his name after the Protestant Martin Luther, who protested the Catholic faith, and started the new LUTHERN religion, throwing out from the Catholic faith what he didn’t like, and keeping what he did like. Interesting!

    Reply
    • Jurgen -  May 16, 2015 - 8:02 pm

      He didn’t. He was named after his father, Martin Luther King, Sr. His father was named after two of his uncles: Martin and Luther.

      Reply
  11. SweetPretzel -  January 17, 2011 - 11:56 am

    Cool

    Reply
  12. Bayardo -  January 17, 2011 - 10:22 am

    You did not mention another Saint Martin Peru

    His name was Saint Martin de Porres son of an spaniard captain and from a slave descendent woman from Panama

    Reply
  13. Queen Sardonic -  January 17, 2011 - 9:21 am

    @pOgs Yeah, so horrible that you can’t even spell it correctly, right?

    Reply
  14. CanonMan -  January 17, 2011 - 8:43 am

    Martin Luther attempted to correct Catholocism, but was rather excommunicated. He then began the religion of Lutheran(ism) which took the main parts of Catholocism. The only major difference is the Canon and Profession of Faith – which voids thier service as not to be the True Body and Blood of Christ. This can mystery can only be transformed by a learned ordained Catholic Minister.

    As for research done by Dictionary.com. FAR OUT!! you really dissected into Latin heritage and the Catholic Faith.

    Nicely done :)

    God Bless

    Reply
  15. Roxanne -  January 17, 2011 - 8:39 am

    I doubt that the etymological meaning of people’s names has any relationship to their lives, unless the name’s owner finds out the etymological meaning and sees it as a sign to live by. In this case, I think there are other things about his name that might have influenced MLK, jr. His name was for all intents and purposes changed when he was six; that’s got to give you a passion for finding who you are and who you can be and an understanding of transformation – and identity and transformation are things that he strove for. Also, Martin Luther was an immeasurably significant and bold reformer of society (indirectly).

    There’s a typo in your piece on him: it’s St. Martin of Tours, not Tour.

    Also, I don’t see any Hebrew in Luther – luit and heri are both Old High German. It would be pretty surprising to me if those words have anything to do with Hebrew, since the Germanic relatives of those words were certainly formed long before any Hebrew speakers were in northwestern Europe. What is your source for that etymology?

    Reply
  16. Rasta -  January 17, 2011 - 8:01 am

    Good for MLK, he was a man of conviction, pity his offspring have turned out to be such useless human beings pimping their father’s legacy and fighting over money they did not earn. Enough talking about useless people. I believe though that MLK success was added by Malcolm X (the real deal that to date have not gotten the respect due him); my theory is that if Malcolm was not as radical as he was the whites would not have been so eager to talk to MLK. Classic tales of choosing the lesser of two evils, because the alternative and the possible ramifications were just too horrifying (Armed black men in the 60s that was as disciplined as the Nation of Islam, that believe in the saying “an eye for an eye”.)

    Reply
  17. katyfitz -  January 17, 2011 - 7:28 am

    That should be St. Martin of Tours.

    Reply
  18. David -  January 17, 2011 - 6:33 am

    Pardon the massive typos, please…

    Reply
  19. Carl -  January 17, 2011 - 6:28 am

    Pinki, there are still many people like MLK Jr. What’s more important, though, is the legacy he left. If we all carry his compassion and vision with us always, he will not have died in vain.

    Reply
  20. Carl -  January 17, 2011 - 6:24 am

    Glenn Beck.

    Reply
  21. David -  January 17, 2011 - 6:19 am

    Martin Luther – 500 year ago dead German white guy, Reformer of a seriously wrong headed medieval Chritianty. Leader of people out of bondage, specifically the bondage of having to be good enough to get God’s love, and get to heaven. Reminded us that the Bible teaches that our way has been bought with the blood of Jesus in our place. Seriously flawed and sinful human being, used by God anyway…

    Martin Luther King Jr. – 50 year ago dead American black guy. Reformer of a seriously wrong headed American society (and Christianty, I might add). Leader of a people out of bondage, specifiaclly the bondage of having to have the right color of skin to be considered worthy of anything good in our land. Reminded us that God loves every person enough to give His life to save us, and that makes every person valued and precious. Seriously flawed and sinful human being, used by God anyway…

    Just my two cents…

    Reply
  22. Gargi -  January 17, 2011 - 4:53 am

    gr8 article!
    thx ya

    Reply
  23. name counts -  January 17, 2011 - 3:55 am

    Setting good example is important for multiracial society, which is global nowdays because that represents what and who you are regardless of the individuality of a person.

    Martian Luther King is good because his name King is associated with peace but not with imperialism.

    Tiger Woods is bad. No further explanation for that.

    I just saw a Spike Lee’s movie.

    Reply
  24. ELIUD PATRICK -  January 17, 2011 - 12:07 am

    It.is realy very interesting and good.I have read alot about this noble man,what he has done need to be hailed.PATRICK

    Reply
  25. Cyberquill -  January 16, 2011 - 11:50 pm

    Too bad he didn’t restore his original first name and only retain the middle name Luther. Michael Luther King would shorten to MILK.

    Reply
  26. Wiiilam Thornborrow -  January 16, 2011 - 11:41 pm

    In the Biblical Hebrew text there are no vowels. The letters MLK form the word king which is pronounced Me-lek. (This is accourding to the vowel pointing of the Masoretic text)Interesting and fitting to say the least.

    Reply
  27. Mr. Raymond Kenneth Petry -  January 16, 2011 - 11:11 pm

    I think, -after some cogitation at length,- that there is a legal problem in assuming the ‘nickname’ of “Martin Luther:” specifically because it is already a famous name and therefore must have been meant characterization more than nickname. Compare, ‘Yo, Einstein’, is not a nickname for a nerd but a characterization,– and no matter how many times everybody uses the characterization for a given, nerd, it never becomes his lawful nickname. (Nor her, nickname, for those who know Einstein’s wife was smart too….)

    In otherwords, “Martin Luther,” is too-popular as a characterization for a religious thinker, to become the legal nickname of any in particular….

    (Compare this to the more rigorously-legal case of plagiarism: You can copy words from the dictionary without a hint of plagiarism, but to copy a famous phrase that is linked to a thereby famous author, makes that a case of plagiarism: The uniqueness, of the famousness, of the phrase….)

    Reply
  28. Mr. Raymond Kenneth Petry -  January 16, 2011 - 11:10 pm

    I think, -after some cogitation at length,- that there is a legal problem in assuming the ‘nickname’ of “Martin Luther:” specifically because it is already a famous name and therefore must have been meant characterization more than nickname. Compare, ‘Yo, Einstein’, is not a nickname for a nerd but a characterization,– and no matter how many times everybody uses the characterization for a given, nerd, it never becomes his lawful nickname. (Nor her, nickname, for those who know Einstein’s wife was smart too….)

    In otherwords, “Martin Luther,” is too-popular as a characterization for a religious thinker, to become the legal nickname of any in particular….

    (Compare this to the more rigorously-legal case of plagiarism: You can copy words from the dictionary without a hint of plagiarism, but to copy a famous phrase that is linked to a thereby famous author, makes that a case of plagiarism: The uniqueness, of the famousness, of the phrase….)

    Reply
  29. Meica Manzano -  January 16, 2011 - 9:27 pm

    I’m going to read a lot about Martin Luther King later….

    Reply
  30. pOgs -  January 16, 2011 - 8:53 pm

    Is it really true that Martin Luther is the founder of Catholic Christianism?

    Reply
  31. Mermaid -  January 16, 2011 - 7:52 pm

    Is it Martin Luther King Day or Martin Luther King JUNIOR Day? Because I know it’s about MLK Jr. but I never hear the Junior part.

    Reply
  32. alfred -  January 16, 2011 - 7:50 pm

    memorable excellent name attibuting to his mission.compromise too late

    Reply
  33. grammar lover -  January 16, 2011 - 7:19 pm

    MY GIVEN NAME MEANS “VISION OF BEAUTY”. WHAT A MISFIT FOR ME! I WONDER IF MICHAEL KING CHANGED HIS NAME BECAUSE OF THE INSIGHT AND KNOWLEDGE MARTIN LUTHER HADOF THE BIBLE WHICH BEGAN THE REFORMATION. TODAY WE ALL READ THE BIBLE BECAUSE OF THIS. THEREFORE, I DON’T THINK THE LATIN, GREEK OR ANY OTHER ANCIENT INTERPRETATION HAS ANYTHING TO DO WITH MLK JR’S NAME OR ACTIONS. HE WAS A BELIEVER IN TRUTH, JUSTICE, AND THE AMERICAN WAY, EITHER OR BOTH CONSTITUTIONALLY AND BIBLICALLY. BY THE WAY, THE CIVIL RIGHTS MOVEMENT INCLUDES HANDICAPPED AND OTHER OTHERWISE PREVIOUSLY DISENFRANCHISED INDIVIDUALS. THE LATTER IS NOT SOLVED AS WAS THE RIGHTS OF RACES, RELIGIONS.

    Reply
  34. MLK | BLOGCHI@mayopia.com -  January 16, 2011 - 6:06 pm

    [...] reaction. — Many of the sites in B’More or Less have yet to be rebuilt — MLK is due respect given him by rebuiling PARKS and planting Roses, instead of shooting guns with some [...]

    Reply
  35. Freethinker -  January 16, 2011 - 5:50 pm

    MLK was indeed awarded the Nobel Peace prize, and he worked hard to deserve it. In fact, he ultimately gave his life for the cause he believed in. A cause, that was and is, Nobel.

    Contrast that with the fact that a Nobel prize was also awarded to Barack Obama, who had accomplished essentially nothing.

    In awarding the coveted prize to Obama, the Nobel committee demonstrated its willingness to debase their own prize in order to advance a social agenda. In so doing, they cheapened the prize for all future recipients. What a shame.

    Reply
  36. Pinki -  January 16, 2011 - 5:28 pm

    Alas, if there were more people in this world like Dr. Martin Luther King. (*Sigh*) Oh, and I enjoyed reading this article immensely. Very informative. But there is one slight thing that contradicts his nature. Martin Luther King wasn’t violent, yet his name, Martin symbolizes war. But overall, his name does symbolize him.

    Reply
  37. pOgs -  January 16, 2011 - 5:02 pm

    That was horrable..

    Reply
  38. Mr. Raymond Kenneth Petry -  January 16, 2011 - 4:56 pm

    The word, king, derives from the Sumerian name, Qingu, who was supra-old-Tiamut’s first-generation-(sired-by-Ra) first-lineage replacement-husband and-Commander shortly after her husband-son Apsu was killed by Enki and she took the Tablet of Destinies from Anu and gave it to Qingu.

    Qingu was Cain-U (Heb. QYN-U, the N is back-of-the-palate-NG):
    Tiamut was T’Mwt former consort of Amun-Ra, married down to Khonsu:
    Apsu was father-Shw (1st-Jehovah) former Kh’AN-Shw (THE LORD Shw);
    Enki was EN-KI lord of the earth (Heb. Cainan);
    Anu was AN-U lord of the heaven-expanse (Heb. Enos), and First Watcher.

    Marduk (Rom. Mars etc.) didn’t understand why she’d take the Tablet, so he was picked to assassinate her.

    And the rest is “history” as they say in undergraduate myth-class….

    Reply
  39. Pugmire -  January 16, 2011 - 4:53 pm

    Perhaps the kind of war Martin Luther King Jr. waged was the right kind. Peaceful, intelligent people uniting to wage war on what they knew was wrong.

    Reply
  40. mmeFB -  January 16, 2011 - 4:26 pm

    I have always been interested in genealogy. In fact I have researched many families. But it seems to me I would run into a lot of insurmountable obstacles trying to trace African-American families. I wonder if anyone has tackles the MLK genealogy. So many genealogists have traced families of famous people that maybe someone has done it for the family of MLK. I do not think that KING is his real family name.

    Reply
  41. arie lopis -  January 16, 2011 - 3:55 pm

    In the Protestan world Martin Luther King, Jr. is a Pioneer that’s what I know.

    regards,
    arie

    Reply
  42. Johnathan Rodriguez -  January 16, 2011 - 3:51 pm

    I believe his name has change the design of how we feel .

    Reply
  43. abc -  January 16, 2011 - 3:32 pm

    nice

    Reply
  44. The Shutt Chute -  January 16, 2011 - 2:50 pm

    A great post. I once thought MLK Jr. might be a communist and even if he does have some socialist leanings, one can’t dismiss all the good he did in forcing the U.S. Federal Government to face the reality of segregation’s unwavering damage to the people of the United States.

    It is most unfortunate that Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated.

    Reply
  45. Maria -  January 16, 2011 - 1:22 pm

    Ironic how, given MLK’s qualities, he was named after a racist and an antisemite.

    Martin Luther published several books on Jews, including “On the Jews and their lies”. He also advocated for slaughtering Jews. There is a rumour (I don’t know if it’s true) that Hitler was inspired by Martin Luther. Does that tell you anything?

    Reply
  46. desert dreamer -  January 16, 2011 - 12:29 pm

    I don’t think MLK’s name reflects his character. His name refers to the main Roman god of war, yet he was an advocate for peace. The only historical significance of his name is the reference to the protestant reformer Martin Luther, another person who questioned the status quo.

    Reply
  47. Love404 -  January 16, 2011 - 11:15 am

    This isn’t true at ALL! I took a course, taught by MLK’s sister, and she said it wasn’t true! She told us the author of one the books about MLK, assumed this. Another student almost got her feelings hurt for trying to give is this same info!

    Visit the MLK birth home in ATL and they will give you the real story behind his name change.

    Reply
  48. Marissa Feilen -  January 16, 2011 - 10:59 am

    I loved the article, though! Very factual.

    Reply
  49. Marissa Feilen -  January 16, 2011 - 10:57 am

    NO!!! MLK Jr. was anything but the king of war!!!

    Reply
  50. LT -  January 16, 2011 - 9:48 am

    f the Good Doctor kept the name Michael King he may have promoted boxing. The non-violent warrior Alpha male devoted his rebelious life to leading and the Sport of Kings, inside Foxing. To be or not to Be, his father thrust his life upon him. A “sprituel” man in his own right in a place where history rules — the shame of his assasination burned the cities by simple fools. Call it urban development — call it interprative reaction. — Many of the sites in B’More or Less have yet to be rebuilt — MLK is due respect given him by replanting PARKS with Roses, instead of shooting guns with some weird hand tilt. And maybe picking up a little trash — by the gun toting hoodlum faction. Even if it doesn’t pay the cash. — Positive actions speak and gain respect –though everything is subject to gossip and misinterpretation. “Praise the Lord and Pass the ammunition” should never be an underlying condition in any situation.

    Reply
  51. Liam -  January 16, 2011 - 9:33 am

    Having vision, passion; he did so much to further the cause of peace, by trying to bridge the acrimonious differences between white and blacks in this country. He was taken away from this world far too young, when will the divide be bridged?

    Reply
  52. Hamed -  January 16, 2011 - 8:57 am

    Very nice story
    I think the name per se does not have any influence in fate or destiny of people, but sometimes the idea behind the “giving a special name” can play a role.
    I believe choosing that name by the father that had the spirit of leadership is an issue that in science is called “confounding factor”. The confounding factor is a factor that is not observed obviously in a reaction but has an important impact on creation of it.
    English speaking; however, English is not my native language, the father being a black reverend thought his young son will follow his idea to be a leader for change, then he decide to choose a name of a leader as “Martin Luther” for him, hoping this name can influence his thinking and the way he reach to his goals.

    Reply
  53. Gabriel -  January 16, 2011 - 8:40 am

    It is not only fascinating but telling as to what inspired Michael King to change his name to Martin Luther King. Truly we get what we say… our words carve our own future… and that is exactly what he KNEW, therefore DID… then became! A true legend that ‘stood on the mountain top’, went against all odds, had visions and (visitations) of Heaven… instructions from above and simply fulfilled them until he couldn’t anymore.

    Reply
  54. Shay -  January 16, 2011 - 8:34 am

    I was actually looking for information about the history of the English language,and i stumbled up on this information on Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. I found it to be remarkable, learning exactly where his name originated, and how effectively it deals with the english language just blew my hair back. this is a very good peice written about MLK Jr and i for one do believe that he live up to every word of what i read about his name. He was an outstanding person. This was an outstanding article written of him. thank you so much for sharing,God knew exactly what name to bless his with and lived up to his name.

    Reply
  55. asdfagadg -  January 16, 2011 - 8:26 am

    hei

    Reply
  56. Queen Sardonic -  January 16, 2011 - 8:01 am

    Fighting? War? Mars? One the one hand, I don’t think that represents MLK Jr very well, since he advocated absolutely NO violence during his fight for freedom, and was a very peaceful man.
    On the other hand, he did ‘fight’ for black rights, so, in a figurative sense, he WAS violent, which does represent his name well. So, I guess it could go either way, depending on how literal or figurative you are.

    Reply
  57. Luther -  January 16, 2011 - 7:48 am

    “Luther is of German and Hebrew origin combining luit, which means “people,” and heri, which means “army” or ‘warrior.’”
    Should the name thus stand for the people’s warrior or the army’s people? The latter seems to make more sense.

    Reply
  58. Alli -  January 16, 2011 - 7:33 am

    Wow :O

    Reply
  59. Ali Rizvi -  January 16, 2011 - 7:21 am

    Although it is commonly held opinion that ‘name’ given to a person has a significant impact on the the future character and accomplishments of the person. I have seen people changing the names of their children, or one’s own to change the circumstances and the direction one seems to be heading.
    I have been toying with the idea of changing my own name to one simply meaning ‘son of Adam’, the ancestor of man. out of sheer disgust with the divisions the humanity seems to have created and the nett outcome of that.
    But truly the environments and the way a person is treated since the early age, and heredity are more significant than the mere name. Every person seems to be endowed with certain physical and mental qualities in the mothers womb whitch drives him/her to a destiny entirely different than the parents, siblings, the closest relatives sharing the heritage.
    I believe he would have been what he ultimately was regardless of the appellation attatched to him.

    Reply
  60. Ezekiel Rage -  January 16, 2011 - 6:41 am

    “What can we learn from the meaning behind Martin Luther King, Jr.’s name?”

    Well, from everything that you guys have just shared with us, I’d have to say: A LOT!

    This was truly a most informative and interesting piece. I enjoyed it immensely!

    Reply
  61. David E. -  January 16, 2011 - 6:32 am

    No. MLK was a much greater man than his hateful namesake.

    Reply
  62. Ezekiel Rage -  January 16, 2011 - 6:31 am

    Wow, you guys have really gone all out on this one, huh? I’m very impressed.

    Well done!

    Reply
  63. gentledove -  January 16, 2011 - 5:30 am

    If the father of Martin Luther King Jr had known that, ‘Michael’ could refer to the Archangel Michael in the Sacred Scripture, he might not have wanted to change his son’s name. For the fact that St. Michael the Archangel would have more power than the Protestant Reformer Martin Luther for being a true warrior. I wish his namee were not changed; for ‘Michael’is Biblical, more Godly and more powerful.

    Gentledove

    Reply
  64. Charles McKinney -  January 16, 2011 - 4:48 am

    Happy Martin Luther King Day! I endorse the notion that the historical meanings of this world changer’s name reflects his qualities and accomplishments. He was a leader who influenced a generation to rise up and to take a stand against the injustices of his time. A true warrior for civil rights, Dr. King inspired people to love, to serve, and to exercise the tenets that our (America’s) founding fathers drafted in the Constitution. May we live up to his great example, continually working for all forms of progress in our society.

    Reply
  65. Castilho -  January 16, 2011 - 3:13 am

    Of course. MLK was given the Nobel prize in 1963, I think, and his logic is clear, bypassing historical facts which were taken as formers of black people’s characteristics. The British Empire’s and other Europeans (from Italians, Lithuanians, Estonians, Russians, Scandinavians and many Arabs) look at the black people as less than them. Soccer clubs in Brazil did not allow black people to play in their squads and it was because of the insistence of key players that Brazil became a soccer power mainly through the skills and ingenuality of black players (Pele, Didi, Garrincha, Leonidas da Silva, Ronaldo, Romario, aso). Black people were not allowed to study in proper schools, take part in civil life properly. THEY WERE NOT PEOPLE!!! Martin Luther’s logic prevailed, because it is a simple and obvious logic. The fact that we today (2007-2010) have a half-black American President governing the world with his full-black mother-in-law and wife and kids (and black-chosen dog), have TIGER WOODS governing in a “noble, superior” sports like GOLF, and Williams sisters in TENNIS, and FOMULA 1-talent and World Champion LEWIS HAMILTON, General Collin Powell, Condoleesa Rice and so many people in the intertainment business, inspiring and influencing the whole world even before MLK succeeded in his fight for the right thing. Unfortunately many white people are not worth their own dignity. They are less than they can be and continue feeding prejudice against INDIANS too. They are not oppressors, but oppressed by ignorance and loose all the nice things we get, when we look up to ower fellow beings, like the Nobel Committee, composed by white Arian Germanic Scandinavian descendents of the “vikings” decided to accord Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr the Nobel Prize in the early 60-ies. These are true fellow beings. These are REALLY NOBLE, not those who because of purported “noblety” of own race, neglect and reject the NOBLE human dignity in INDIANS AND BLACKS.

    Reply
  66. ssenyonjo enock -  January 16, 2011 - 3:02 am

    MLK Jr it is a historical name and not historical only but with faith and warrior.

    Reply
  67. cutiepup12 -  January 16, 2011 - 1:59 am

    interesting…

    Reply

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