Dictionary.com

What word did you last look up, and why?

Recently we asked members of the Dictionary.com Facebook page a simple question: What was the last word you looked up, what was the specific issue you were trying to solve, and what were the circumstances? The results floored us. At last count, more than 450 people shared their stories. Here are a few examples:

  • “Looked up “enure/inure” for supervisor as he was unsure of meaning and I had never heard of the word.”
  • Wanderlust. I used it in conversation and the person I was with had never heard it. I decided best to check I had the meaning right!”
  • Dawdle: looking for another way to say futz.”

Now we would like to hear from you. In the comments below, tell us the most recent word you searched for, what was the piece of information that you were trying to answer, and what were you doing at the time?

455 Comments

  1. Tejaswini -  December 19, 2013 - 9:24 am

    Looked up for Lollapalooza :) It means an extraordinary person,thing or any other event.

    Reply
  2. Kayla -  February 2, 2013 - 1:50 pm

    “Sycophant.” I was reading a poem by Ralph Waldo Emerson and needed to know… It’s really an interesting word. It means: a self-seeking, servile flatterer; fawning parasite.

    Reply
  3. Ultrasingaporean -  December 19, 2012 - 11:45 pm

    searched HIPPOPOTOMONSTROSESQUIPPEDALIOPHOBIA cause i was finding a list of phobias. It means fear of big words.

    Reply
  4. Mike in Germany -  November 16, 2012 - 8:44 am

    I looked up the word “inevitable” to find out it’s meaning and origin for my wife who is German, only then having to look up the words “evitable” and “evite”. The word “invite” is rather close to “evite” and found out that they have the opposite meaning. All this due to a commercial on German TV with Brad Pitt for Channel No5…

    Reply
  5. Me! -  November 8, 2012 - 10:56 am

    I’m currently writing a book so I looked up the meaning of ‘taciturn’, as I’ve heard it before and wanted to make sure I was using it right.

    Reply
  6. chocolatechips12347 -  November 7, 2012 - 2:30 pm

    @Dante bahahaha that was funny i literally burst out laughing when i read the definition:)

    Reply
  7. Apple spice -  November 3, 2012 - 1:07 am

    Prostitution. I thought it meant someone who entertains for money soooo I was convinced balloon artists could be could be considered prostitutes….I was proven wrong

    Reply
  8. denzlestrife -  November 1, 2012 - 11:48 am

    i looked up emo and goth seeing as to i AM goth i wanted to see the dictionary.com defanition of what iv’e been up to…..turns out im a very famouse type of art ahah

    Reply
  9. Anonymous... duh -  October 31, 2012 - 3:34 am

    looked up hemp cuz it came up for my homework

    Reply
  10. gyhkdtyk -  October 29, 2012 - 6:43 pm

    i looked up calendsarinado to see what the def wazzzz gjcgct lolzzzz heheheheheheheh mwah

    Reply
  11. sammy -  October 24, 2012 - 8:20 pm

    “word” because they talked about it on a wizards of waverly place episode

    Reply
  12. SHayes -  October 24, 2012 - 11:48 am

    I look up random words on here all the time just for the fact that this site is unblocked from the schools filter and I’m bored as hell for the 3 hours I’m stuck here in the same old class room. Mo Opts is so boring and long. 10 min left. :)

    Reply
  13. Pam -  October 20, 2012 - 7:46 pm

    I looked up Juggernaut, just today. I heard it on T.v or radio and wasn’t sure just what is was. Powerful comes to mind.

    Reply
  14. Luffy -  October 17, 2012 - 11:57 am

    Undead, I was playing Red Dead Redemption Undead Nightmare and my 4 yr old sister barged in my room and asked me what i was playing i told her Red Dead Redemption Undead Nightmare ‘whats undead’, she asks, so i told her… then she wanted to play so i kicked her out of my room

    P.S never mess with a gamer in his session time

    Reply
  15. haley -  October 16, 2012 - 2:47 pm

    barrier – to find all of its different meanings.

    Reply
  16. toby -  October 15, 2012 - 1:21 pm

    sopranos, for school. I was supposed to look it up to see if there was an “e” at the end. there isn’t… I hope. :P

    Reply
  17. Olivia -  October 11, 2012 - 5:11 pm

    abhorred; for vocab. hw

    Reply
  18. Jose -  October 10, 2012 - 5:31 am

    hierachery -to make sure I was using it in the correct context.

    Reply
  19. Ashley Winston -  October 8, 2012 - 10:03 am

    The last word I looked up was “specked” which means a home that was built with all details and upgrades done at the discretion of the builder ready for a buyer to buy.This is a new field for me and my manger kept using the word and I had never heard it before.

    Reply
  20. Alex -  October 7, 2012 - 5:55 pm

    thesis, for school

    Reply
  21. Audrey -  October 3, 2012 - 10:38 am

    I looked up “stenotic” in reference to a medical condition– “stenotic cervix.”

    Reply
  22. read hed -  September 30, 2012 - 9:05 pm

    like your comment @shawn

    “”

    Looking for a word to describe a high capacity for memorization, as opposed to intelligence, because intelligence also infers a high reasoning capacity.

    Reply
  23. read hed -  September 30, 2012 - 8:59 pm

    i looked up ambient…
    i loved it and used it in a poem

    Reply
  24. Ajay -  September 30, 2012 - 7:13 am

    Looked for the usage of ‘effect’ as verb. MS word underlined it as a grammatical error when I was writing a news story.

    The sentence went like this: Members of the community effected a traffic blockade.

    MS word suggested to use ‘affected’ instead. It even has an explanation for that!

    Reply
  25. Gerardo -  September 28, 2012 - 8:21 pm

    “Leather carving”, while trying to translate it into Spanish, altough I was left with a doubt.The Spanish word I was trying to translate was “resacado.”

    Reply
  26. Tia -  September 28, 2012 - 4:39 pm

    Concupiscence…because i read it in someone’s comment of this article, and didn’t know that word. Will totally use it now. Meta-Huzzah!

    Reply
  27. Sofia -  September 26, 2012 - 1:46 pm

    “Perjurer” because i needed something to call my two-timing boyfriend when i broke up with him!

    P.S.) NOW SINGLE AND READY TO MINGLE!

    Reply
  28. Gabi -  September 26, 2012 - 1:24 pm

    I looked up “ziggurat” because I was reading about the Sumerians and i had no clue as to what it meant…I do now! ^-^

    Reply
  29. Ben -  September 26, 2012 - 1:12 pm

    Floccinaucinihilipilification to check spelling

    Reply
  30. Alexandria Troi (Ali) -  September 26, 2012 - 12:36 pm

    Pretentious: I was doing vocabulary for school, and this was one of the words in the definition of the word Arrogant.

    Reply
  31. Jay Subramanyam -  September 26, 2012 - 12:25 pm

    I looked up the word ‘Serendipity’. I have come across it quite often without ever bothering to check upon its correct meaning. This time, I decided I must do so.

    Reply
  32. Kristin -  September 26, 2012 - 12:09 pm

    I looked for something somewhere between “resist” and “thwart.” Something stubborn. I didn’t find it, so if anyone has a suggestion let me know!

    Reply
  33. Kris -  September 26, 2012 - 11:57 am

    The last word I looked up: hispanic.
    Specific issue I was trying to solve: whether hispanic pertains to people of Spanish descent or solely latinos, as it is used in conversation these days.
    The circumstances: I am of Spanish descent and wondered whether that makes me hispanic.

    Reply
  34. bob the tomato is not my real name. -  September 26, 2012 - 11:45 am

    tedious,nestled,verdant,shrilled,auburn,insipid,retorted,meager,awry,and mane 4 school work which i m still doing. but i got bored so i started reading some random articles from random websites. and dang this is a real long comments board!

    Reply
  35. okncfjndg -  September 26, 2012 - 11:31 am

    pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis

    Reply
  36. Leah -  September 26, 2012 - 10:28 am

    I looked up the correct spelling of “benefitting”. It feels as though it should be spelled with two “t”s instead of one. But it appears as though both are listed on this site.

    Reply
  37. ????? -  September 26, 2012 - 10:14 am

    I looked up the word “nerd” because everyone is always using it but i don’t hink anyone really knows what itmeans.

    Reply
  38. Leanna Harris -  September 26, 2012 - 10:07 am

    I looked up allocate for my English class assignment!

    Reply
  39. kkc -  September 26, 2012 - 9:39 am

    i looked up solitude….

    Reply
  40. Pietro Del Buono -  September 26, 2012 - 8:59 am

    I looked up “between” and “among”.

    Often in grammar books it is stated that “between” is used when addressing two (between you and I) and “among” when addressing more. Sounds simple? Well it is not. I have been and remain rather reluctant to write or say that “Switzerland is among France, Germany and Italy …” or that “Mary sat among John, Charles and George”…

    The search for the perfect word continues…

    Reply
  41. Kelly -  September 26, 2012 - 8:07 am

    onomatopoeia, so I could understand the comic strip.

    Reply
  42. Shawn -  September 26, 2012 - 8:05 am

    Looking for a word to describe a high capacity for memorization, as opposed to intelligence, because intelligence also infers a high reasoning capacity.

    Reply
  43. Jeff -  September 26, 2012 - 7:27 am

    The last word i looked up was “slump”. I was writing an article about life and relationships. I just like to find out what better word to use to give emphasis to what I was writing about.

    Reply
  44. Violet -  September 26, 2012 - 7:17 am

    I looked up the longest word in the English language which turned out to be pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis so I could learn to spell it for all my friends and impress my crush :)

    Reply
  45. zora -  September 26, 2012 - 7:08 am

    i looked up overt for the synonym for my school work

    Reply
  46. Joe Aiken -  September 26, 2012 - 6:42 am

    A Texan colleague (I’m from UK) used the word “drug” a couple of times as a past tense verb, e.g. “I drug it behind me”. I couldn’t fathom what he meant, so had to look this up, to discover it’s a non-standard past tense of drag, used mainly in the Southern USA.

    Reply
  47. tommy -  September 26, 2012 - 6:13 am

    I looked up “mewling”, because I thought it was a funny word to say.

    Reply
  48. ESL teacher -  September 26, 2012 - 4:36 am

    “Classes” because my student mispronounced it.

    Reply
  49. Farm Boy -  September 26, 2012 - 3:30 am

    ” agglutinate…” not exactly an every-day word, but it could be!
    ‘To bring together, to clump.’ It’s gotta be worth at least 20 points in Scrabble if played correctly…maybe not…excuse me…I need to clean up the agglutinated kitty litter left behind by Mr. Jingles…

    Reply
  50. Shing -  September 26, 2012 - 3:08 am

    looked up
    pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis

    Reply
  51. ceejay leal -  September 26, 2012 - 1:56 am

    The word elastomeric, as in elastomeric sealant for roofs. I was making a web copy for it and I wanted to understand the word better, so I looked it up!

    Reply
  52. zara -  September 26, 2012 - 12:55 am

    i looked up knoll because of my HOMEWORK!!!!

    Reply
  53. Miggles -  September 26, 2012 - 12:52 am

    In writing my novel, I needed synonyms for smooth. Found loads! :)

    Reply
  54. Jinnie -  September 26, 2012 - 12:47 am

    I looked up for pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis!!!

    Reply
  55. "Unknown" person -  September 26, 2012 - 12:38 am

    Influenza, just needed the meaning and spell check.

    Reply
  56. Ramblin Rose -  September 26, 2012 - 12:07 am

    I looked up ‘butte’, ‘mesa’, and ‘plateau’, to learn the difference between the three terms.

    Reply
  57. Johanna -  September 25, 2012 - 9:59 pm

    i looked up animism because i have an art assignment that requires me to briefly explain it’s meaning :P

    Reply
  58. EmmZZZy -  September 25, 2012 - 9:07 pm

    The last word I looked up was reticulated for a science project.

    Reply
  59. Dylan Rogers -  September 25, 2012 - 9:03 pm

    I most recently looked up the word “mysticism”. I saw it, and wasn’t quite sure what it meant in terms of religion.

    Reply
  60. Sean -  September 25, 2012 - 8:47 pm

    I looked up lachrymator because it was in my chemistry lab safety information, and it would definitely be best to know what that means. Luckily it is just something that makes eyes water.

    Reply
  61. Goatmilk -  September 25, 2012 - 8:45 pm

    pulchritudinous was bored

    Reply
  62. Mary -  September 25, 2012 - 8:39 pm

    porcelain – because I couldn’t figure out how to spell it.

    Reply
  63. jeffrey -  September 25, 2012 - 8:23 pm

    btw lol ceylan

    Reply
  64. jeffrey -  September 25, 2012 - 8:21 pm

    I searched pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis because i was bored :D

    Reply
  65. tweety -  September 25, 2012 - 8:12 pm

    I looked up happenstance because I used it in conversation and no one knew what I was talking about.

    Reply
  66. Sam Pollack -  September 25, 2012 - 7:25 pm

    Tintinnabulation! That word was used in a kid’s book, a rarity of it’s kind. What a cool word.

    Reply
  67. Dap -  September 25, 2012 - 7:23 pm

    Lanced, becuase in Sue Kaufmans Diary of a mad housewife a ear nose and throat specialist lanced a childs ear.

    Reply
  68. A. C. Young -  September 25, 2012 - 7:22 pm

    I looked up the word “puissant” because my spell check told me “puissantly” was not a word, and I wanted to see what the correct adverb form was.

    Turns out, my spell check glitched. Typical.

    Reply
  69. Saba -  September 25, 2012 - 6:55 pm

    Looked up “senile” because my dad was describing a leader of an organization with that word… plus the leader was old… so knowing the defenition made sense about the personality of that person.

    Reply
  70. Kyler -  September 25, 2012 - 6:30 pm

    Methionylthreonylthreonylglutaminylarginyl…isoleucine is all I could find of the longest word known to man, at 189,819 letters. It’s the chemical name of titin, the largest known protein. Methionylglutaminylarginyltyrosylglutamyl…serine is the longest known published word, at 1,909 letters. Pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis is the longest word in a major dictionary, at 45 letters. (I’m looking up words for a hw assignment, got sidetracked by this)

    Reply
  71. Joe Schmoe -  September 25, 2012 - 6:26 pm

    “Gullible”… Somebody told me it wasn’t in the dictionary…

    Reply
  72. Speedy -  September 25, 2012 - 6:25 pm

    It’s me again, I am looking up words for a hw assignment…this page is awesome!

    (Kyler)

    Reply
  73. Kyler -  September 25, 2012 - 6:23 pm

    The chemical name of tintin is the longest word known to man, with 189,819 letters. Methionylthreonylthreonylglutaminylarginyl…isoleucine is all I can find. The longest published word has 1,909 letters, and all I could find of it was Methionylglutaminylarginyltyrosylglutamyl…serine. Pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis is the longest word in a major dictionary. I looked up Rebeka’s word last.

    Reply
  74. Rebecca D -  September 25, 2012 - 5:54 pm

    “Factory-specialization” is the last word I looked up. It was for a Social Studies assignment… Which I’m still not done with… Yeah… Anyways, we are studying the United States of America’s second Industrial Revolution… It’s boring… but necessary… *Sigh* (P.S.- I don’t know what I’d do without Dictionary.com!)

    Reply
  75. Ashli -  September 25, 2012 - 5:25 pm

    I looked up “plodder” because I needed to for my homework….LOL

    But I love dictionary.com, don’t get me wrong.

    Ashli :) <3 :)

    Reply
  76. Janette -  September 25, 2012 - 5:20 pm

    I looked up the word frigid for my brother, he wanted to make sure he was using it correctly in an essay.

    Reply
  77. Daniel Xero -  September 25, 2012 - 4:49 pm

    I looked up fallout, not only for a song I’m gonna write, but also for a Linkin Park song.

    Reply
  78. Laura terren -  September 25, 2012 - 3:19 pm

    I looked up “respect” to find an easy way to define the word for my 5 year old daughter. ;)

    Reply
  79. anonymous -  September 25, 2012 - 2:55 pm

    Floccinaucinihilipilification! just cuz!

    Reply
  80. MsWormwood -  September 25, 2012 - 2:48 pm

    I’m looking up lots of words and using the thesaurus heavily because I am trying to avoid the word “issue” in favor of more precise words like “problem,” “matter,” “complication,” and even the also-overused “concerns.”

    Reply
  81. Bug -  September 25, 2012 - 2:37 pm

    I lookedup dogs, because I was looking for a cute picture. :)

    Reply
  82. Wenshott -  September 25, 2012 - 12:46 pm

    I looked up paregoric. I could tell from the context that it was concoted from opium and anise, but I wondered if that was all and also what its proper use was.

    Reply
  83. Mike -  September 25, 2012 - 12:32 pm

    I looked up the word ‘natural’, for some research on food labeling. The word seems to be too frequently used in the supermarket.

    Reply
  84. Christopher -  September 25, 2012 - 12:08 pm

    I looked up “algo” recently. I had used it as shorthand for algorithm. A friend misunderstood me, and told me that was a synonym for “pain.” I looked it up: she was right. That doesn’t change the fact that computer literate folk use it as an abbreviation for algorithm!

    Reply
  85. Rita J. Kuchta -  September 25, 2012 - 11:14 am

    In reading two novels recently, I came across two words I had to look
    up, as I was very curious as to their meaning. One was “pterodactyl”
    and the other was “parkour runs”. The definitions were very interesting
    to say the least.

    Reply
  86. Rita J. Kuchta -  September 25, 2012 - 10:45 am

    In reading two novels recently, I ran across two words I had to look up
    as I was curious. One was “pterodactyl” and the other was “parkout runs”.
    The definitions were very interesting to say the least.

    Reply
  87. Hannah -  September 25, 2012 - 10:38 am

    i look up baffle

    Reply
  88. Ceylan -  September 25, 2012 - 9:47 am

    Pulchritudinous… just to know what i would dump the boyfriend for – but then i am glad i looked it up before doing so! :)

    Reply
  89. Ajius -  September 25, 2012 - 9:32 am

    I looked up ‘Gehenna’ – Research for a play I am writing.

    Reply
  90. Oliver Webb -  September 25, 2012 - 8:44 am

    i looked up pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis just because its one of my favorite words to say

    Reply
  91. Rudi -  September 25, 2012 - 7:52 am

    “Hulking.” I hate that word “hulking.”

    -The Great Gatsby

    Reply
  92. Rachel -  September 25, 2012 - 6:59 am

    I looked up “free will” and “predestination” for a school project.

    Reply
  93. Antonio Santos do Nascimento -  September 25, 2012 - 6:39 am

    “Jezeu Christne” it is the second person in Hinduism god religion. “Ekklesias” that means meeting (of people). Christians met in particular houses/Ekklesias to listen letters of apostles. I like etymology.

    Reply
  94. Nancy -  September 25, 2012 - 6:37 am

    I looked up elegist because I wanted to verify its pronunciation.

    Reply
  95. mimi -  September 25, 2012 - 6:16 am

    dexterity

    Reply
  96. Noel -  September 25, 2012 - 4:32 am

    I’m looking up words beginning with “over” to find pairs of heterophones (heteronyms, if you like), and I have found entries like “overt rimming” and “overt rump”. “Overt rimming” kind of caught my attention until I realized it is supposed to be “overtrimming”. “Overt rump” has related searches involving “rump” rather than “trump”. I think that an overtrump has more to do with card playing rather than human anatomy.

    Reply
  97. Gypsy Pennefeather -  September 25, 2012 - 4:17 am

    I looked up “halcyon days” because I heard the phrase in an Agatha Christie drama on television.

    Reply
  98. Kalpana -  September 25, 2012 - 3:43 am

    I looked up for speenful as i wanted to call someone by that adjective

    Reply
  99. Jamie S -  September 25, 2012 - 2:35 am

    I looked up “sanction,” because it seems to to have two contradictory meanings: a) to approve, ratify, or allow something, and
    b) to censure or restrict something.
    I am still kind of confused.

    Reply
  100. Ashni -  September 24, 2012 - 11:23 pm

    Looked up Iconoclast. Didnt mean what I expected it to.

    Reply
  101. Hannah -  September 24, 2012 - 10:02 pm

    I looked up Consanguinity for my homework on the Declaration of Independence…

    Reply
  102. Savannah -  September 24, 2012 - 8:15 pm

    It means “HI.” What did I look up?

    Answer: Hello.

    Reply
  103. Casey -  September 24, 2012 - 8:11 pm

    I looked up QAT

    Reply
  104. Two-Faced Angel -  September 24, 2012 - 7:44 pm

    Wretched. I was trying to remember a word I’d heard a while ago that was a synonym for it but couldn’t remember the word. It turned out to be ‘abject’.

    Reply
  105. S -  September 24, 2012 - 7:18 pm

    The last word I looked up was impertinence. I needed to make sure I was using it in the correct context. I was!!

    Reply
  106. S -  September 24, 2012 - 7:17 pm

    “Impertinence.” I needed to make sure I was using the word in the correct context. I was!

    Reply
  107. Susie -  September 24, 2012 - 6:46 pm

    I looked up ‘emotive’ after I heard someone use the word in reference to a friend of mine. I wanted to clarify the difference between ‘emotive’ and ‘emotional’ as character traits. In the event, the dictionary definitions overlapped quite closely, although I’m not convinced they are the same thing!

    Reply
  108. Derrick Tran -  September 24, 2012 - 6:31 pm

    I looked up reversals because it was in my homework. It was easy!

    Reply
  109. Sue -  September 24, 2012 - 5:50 pm

    looked up the missile, because i thought i spelled it wrong. turnes out there’s “missal”, “missel”, “mistle”, and “missile”. that was interesting.

    Reply
  110. Lu -  September 24, 2012 - 5:27 pm

    I looked up the word “Punta,” because it was in a news article I was reading on the skiers accident on a mountain where there was an avalanche. I’ve heard of the town Punta Gouda, FL and I wondered about that word. I had to look it up using the Spanish tab. Must mean the end of something? Still not sure.

    Reply
  111. Ruffles -  September 24, 2012 - 5:25 pm

    Traversable, because Google Chrome’s spell checker had never heard of the word, and I was afraid I had lost my mind. Can you believe it?

    Reply
  112. Emalie -  September 24, 2012 - 5:12 pm

    I looked up dichlorodiphenyltrichlorethare because it was in my 6th grade homework

    Reply
  113. rizzo -  September 24, 2012 - 4:47 pm

    I looked up dichotomy after reading in in a botanical guide. “A mode of branching by constant forking, as in some stems, in veins of leaves, etc.”

    Reply
  114. Jasmine -  September 24, 2012 - 4:40 pm

    I looked up “stomata” because a friend of mine asked me to proofread his bio paper, and I wanted to see if it really was a plural form and find out what the singular version was.

    Reply
  115. Indigo -  September 24, 2012 - 4:37 pm

    I looked up ‘de rigueur’ because I was not sure if it meant ‘highly popular fashion’ or ‘strictly required’. It means strictly required, but this meaning is sometimes employed in the context of fashion (eg ‘white gloves are
    de rigueur at Ascot’).

    Reply
  116. Daniel -  September 24, 2012 - 4:26 pm

    Civics- I know what it means, but I wanted to use the official definition as part of an essay.

    Reply
  117. nicole -  September 24, 2012 - 4:22 pm

    I looked up optimistic for the sentence so I could cheat on a test :)

    Reply
  118. cj -  September 24, 2012 - 3:40 pm

    abash
    wanted to see how many definitions there were
    10!

    Reply
  119. sarna -  September 24, 2012 - 3:33 pm

    i looked up defenestration for my school work

    Reply
  120. marycakes -  September 24, 2012 - 3:17 pm

    billeted – because my father likes to throw out million dollar words and he actually used it in a sentance – I guess that’s where I got my interest in words and how to use them. My question is how to tell him that he used it incorrectly??

    It means: to lodge or to provide lodging for

    Reply
  121. Alice -  September 24, 2012 - 2:40 pm

    I looked up visage for my AP English Language and Composition class. It is from “Dr. Heigdegger’s Experiment”, the next short story that smy class is reading.

    Reply
  122. Kat -  September 24, 2012 - 2:22 pm

    I looked up “yarboroughs” because it showed up in a word list for a game I was playing on my phone

    Reply
  123. Abigail -  September 24, 2012 - 1:59 pm

    I looked up abstract diction for a definition.

    Reply
  124. Brittany -  September 24, 2012 - 12:57 pm

    Swag becuase i wanted to know what it really meant it. Its kinda of a pirate tearm meaning booty or treasure

    Reply
  125. Dovid -  September 24, 2012 - 12:55 pm

    I looked up “jingoist” to make sure I used it correctly in responding to an ultra-conservative “friend” on facebook…

    Reply
  126. Maria -  September 24, 2012 - 12:49 pm

    “Calyx” because I wanted to be sure that the plural of “calyx” was “calyces” before I used it in a sentence.

    Reply
  127. Christian -  September 24, 2012 - 11:37 am

    Writing a story, I came to a block when a term I wanted was on the tip of my tongue–so I looked up a synonym, which was “wanderer.” The word I was looking for was “nomad.”

    Reply
  128. bob jones -  September 24, 2012 - 11:29 am

    I looked up the word ‘a.’

    Reply
  129. Punkgirl500 -  September 24, 2012 - 11:19 am

    i looked up basin because i was reading about the basin and range region i wasnt sure what it meant

    Reply
  130. Andrea -  September 24, 2012 - 11:07 am

    I looked up inebriate because my ELA teacher made me look it up.

    Reply
  131. Sonja -  September 24, 2012 - 9:50 am

    I looked up “aggrandize” because I saw it in a quote and I wasn’t quite certain as to what it meant.

    Reply
  132. 7kud -  September 24, 2012 - 9:38 am

    I looked up omnipresent! I cause I think it’s a cool word and wanted to use it in something….

    Reply
  133. Bobby -  September 24, 2012 - 9:33 am

    I looked up “harrow” because I thought it rhymed with “sorrow”…. it doesnt. Oops.

    Reply
  134. Kt -  September 24, 2012 - 9:17 am

    “Incumbent” while reading an NPR article about the presidential race.

    Reply
  135. ggg -  September 24, 2012 - 9:01 am

    Jawas are from star wars

    Reply
  136. TDubba -  September 24, 2012 - 8:50 am

    I looked up “personable” because I wanted to use it in a review I was writing of my manager and I wanted to make sure it meant what I thought it meant, and it did!

    Reply
  137. nauman -  September 24, 2012 - 8:43 am

    portrayed: because i was unsure what the exact meaning meant

    Reply
  138. DaBing -  September 24, 2012 - 8:16 am

    Looked up “remiss” because I wanted to make sure I understood the meaning before I sent an email to my boss (she’s has a degree in journalism). ;-)

    Reply
  139. josie long -  September 24, 2012 - 8:13 am

    i looked up perlustration, as it was in a book about Stalin that I was reading.
    By the way, antidisestablishmentarianism ISN’T the longest word in the english dictionary – floccinaucinihilipilification is!

    Reply
  140. Tom -  September 24, 2012 - 7:41 am

    Fourscore. Coul not recall what it was. 4×20=80+7 gives you “Fourscore and seven years ago our forefathers….”. So a score of years is 20 years, also pulchritudnious. It did not exist in this dictionary, but pulchritude does. So. Is the “…nious” a legitimate ending, or is it made up?

    Reply
  141. Robin Shubert -  September 24, 2012 - 7:37 am

    Looked up “promulgate” because I was reading some legal paperwork at work and had to make sure I was up-to-date on my legalese for the doctor I work for – he WILL ask what it means!

    Reply
  142. C.J. Moran -  September 24, 2012 - 7:12 am

    I looked up “abdabs” because in the novel I was finishing, a character says he had the “screaming abdabs”, and I wasn’t sure of the spelling.

    I found that I was spelling it correctly but the derivation said that it dated back only to the 1950s. As my character was speaking in 1931, he had to say something else, instead.

    Reply
  143. sarah -  September 24, 2012 - 6:22 am

    “Scath”–from a 19th-century Scottish translation of a hymn by Martin Luther. It means injury or harm.

    Reply
  144. Stiltzkin -  September 24, 2012 - 6:02 am

    I looked up “scolionophobia” because a new semester had just begun.

    Reply
  145. Lilly -  September 24, 2012 - 5:34 am

    I looked up “nubbin” because my teacher used it in an english criticism packet. It made my day that it is a real word!

    Reply
  146. Julia -  September 24, 2012 - 4:17 am

    Intracellular. I’m doing science homework. In fact, that’s what I should be doing right now…

    Reply
  147. AG -  September 24, 2012 - 3:40 am

    @George: Thanks so much for that clarification. I never noticed before that the word “Content” can be used as Noun, Verb and an Adjective. It sounds different when its a Noun. It means “satisfied” when used as a verb or an adjective. For Example, “I am content with what I have”.

    Reply
  148. theresa -  September 24, 2012 - 3:20 am

    I was looking up for cold blooded animals

    Reply
  149. pete moss -  September 23, 2012 - 11:25 pm

    I was emailing a buddy and wanted to make sue that my “retort” was coming from my mouth and not from a barrel of a gun. At the time either would have deemed appropriate!

    Reply
  150. Jaimy Kaly -  September 23, 2012 - 9:21 pm

    I looked up “Spleen” when studying for one of my classes because I don’t know what one is or looks like!
    [I also checked Google Images -- It looks super weird!]

    Reply
  151. Paula -  September 23, 2012 - 9:20 pm

    I used the word vignette in a sentence and someone wanted to know what it meant so I looked it up to share the dictionary definition. Then I spent the last hour looking up all of the other words posted here…good one this week! A lot of fun.

    Reply
  152. Kamalee -  September 23, 2012 - 7:31 pm

    So I just looked up optometrist and ophthalmologist because they both have to do with eye sight and I’m sorta confused and my handheld dictionary didn’t have it. I am looking up these words for health homework, its extra credit for my class if I do bad on the test, which i probably will… not! But I guess it helps.

    Reply
  153. ImInvisible -  September 23, 2012 - 6:59 pm

    pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis, because it is the longest word.

    Reply
  154. Random word searcher -  September 23, 2012 - 6:49 pm

    I decided to read many of the posts here. I am seeing a few trends:
    1. Group of people who look up words for own self knowledge (curious)
    2. Group of people who look up words to prove they are right about something
    by the way, if you are that person, seriously, you are so worthy of praise and adoration for “being right” on that one word for that one person, everyone should bow down for your intelligence and…oh, hahahaha!!! I just think it’s a little funny that someone would actually go out of their way to prove that they are right about something as small as a word, or anything really. Like,
    “You were WRONG- Fuscia is a color! I was right, I was RIGHT, I was RIGHT! Yay me!!! I’m so right…”
    “It’s just a word.”
    “But I WAS RIGHT!”
    LOL!!!
    3. Group of people who are looking for a specific word, such as for a book, report, etc. or is homework related
    4. Group of people who don’t didn’t know how to spell the word.
    5. Group of people who are playing some sort of spelling or word game and need affirmation that their word is actually a word and/or actually correct (scrabblers)

    As for my word, I would fall in the first group- I was looking up the word “alamarzoo” because I wondered if there was such a word. There is none. But Kalamazoo is a place in Michigan, and the word is thought to have originated from Potawatomi or Odawa peoples, both of whom are Native American tribes.

    Reply
  155. L -  September 23, 2012 - 5:31 pm

    Sloe – playing Scrabble, I played it, NO FREAKIN’ IDEA what it means

    Reply
  156. hannah -  September 23, 2012 - 5:23 pm

    pulchritudinous…. because dictionary.com posted it

    Reply
  157. Madison -  September 23, 2012 - 5:18 pm

    just looked up “vigorously” on thesaurus because i needed a synonym for it for a paper that didn’t sound so weird! :)

    Reply
  158. Joni -  September 23, 2012 - 5:02 pm

    i was helping my nephew with his homework and we had to choose a word to describe someone making his way in the dark. He chose navigate and i chose grope, so i looked up both words to make sure my answer was right. :-)

    Reply
  159. Michael Yoo -  September 23, 2012 - 4:11 pm

    I looked up bourgeoisie because it came out in a history book

    Reply
  160. Sue -  September 23, 2012 - 3:44 pm

    I looked up “love” to find another word to use instead. People say the word all the time, and it is such a small word for such a big feeling. Haven’t found a better word, yet.

    Reply
  161. Dingo990 -  September 23, 2012 - 3:35 pm

    Just looked up convey as I needed a substitute, because my essay was starting to look like “the many uses of the word convey” =P

    Reply
  162. Dez -  September 23, 2012 - 3:04 pm

    I love the suggestion from eyewitness of having a random page. I too used to love flipping open the pages of my mother’s huge unabridged edition just to read and learn.
    It is amazing the places I go nowadays that paper dictionaries are not a standard shelved item.

    Reply
  163. Dez -  September 23, 2012 - 2:54 pm

    I looked up gratitude and gratuitous. I was searching for a word that expressed a feeling of not being able to repay a kind deed received from another.

    Reply
  164. Doris -  September 23, 2012 - 2:45 pm

    pulchritudinous because dictionary.com recommended it (:

    Reply
  165. Tony -  September 23, 2012 - 2:43 pm

    I looked up the word “tendril” because it was in “Lord of the Flies.” I had no idea what it meant and couldn’t figure it out by the context.

    Reply
  166. Ally -  September 23, 2012 - 2:42 pm

    I looked up the definition of recollection because I needed it for 2 of my classes in one day and I really didn’t want to use an actuall dictionary so I used dictionary.com, this was alot faster.

    Reply
  167. Calm Down Curly -  September 23, 2012 - 2:20 pm

    I looked up “Edict of Nantes” for a World History II project. I then looked up “edict” to see if my educated geuss of the definition was accurate (it was, I’m such a nerd ☻). I give full credit of my name to Louis Tomlinson! Go 1D☺

    Reply
  168. loobs -  September 23, 2012 - 2:20 pm

    Searched the word Cover: to elaborate on my concept with a definitive meaning for my thesis.

    Reply
  169. Matt-Matt -  September 23, 2012 - 2:04 pm

    I looked up the word emissary. I’m doing homework for a Pre-IB English class.

    Reply
  170. Chris O -  September 23, 2012 - 1:52 pm

    I looked up Versed in the thesaurus so that I could use it in an essay.

    Reply
  171. Gregory -  September 23, 2012 - 1:26 pm

    I had 3 different words going at once, so I’m just going to put all 3 words.

    Rebut- “to oppose by contrary proof.”
    Fiat- “an authoritative decree, sanction, or order”
    Pulchritudinous- Fancy word for beautiful

    First two were because I’m in Freshman Debate, and the third because Rebeka said it at the top and i was wondering also!

    Reply
  172. Peter V -  September 23, 2012 - 1:09 pm

    I searched for the definition ‘amalgamation’ because I was trying to find another word to use for fruit and chicken salad (because I don’t think of salad when I see chicken or fruit salad). All this from my wife suggesting making chicken salad for dinner.

    Reply
  173. Jimmy -  September 23, 2012 - 1:08 pm

    Looked up Pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis (new-mono-ultra-micro-scopic-silly-volcano-cone-ee-oe-sis) {<–That was the pronounciation}

    Because I'm in Freshman Biology, and that was to be defined as the Problem of the Day.

    Means "a lung disease caused by silica dust" and silica dust is ash from a Volcano if i remember correctly…

    Reply
  174. Melissa -  September 23, 2012 - 12:22 pm

    I looked up “philosophy” because I needed to use it for a project

    Reply
  175. Destiny -  September 23, 2012 - 12:11 pm

    “Wandering”, in the thesaurus section. I am writing a short story for my Intro to Creative Writing class, and I am making a point to put emphasis on using stronger nouns and verbs in my papers, rather than relying on those clunky adjectives and adverbs that can overtake a good paper. :) In this case, “drifting” fit the bill quite nicely and really helped paint a picture for the scene.

    Having taken Latin in high school and having a basic understanding of Greek roots from independent studying, I have been relying on dictionary.com less for definitions and much more for its thesaurus services.

    Reply
  176. Dolores Jeanne -  September 23, 2012 - 11:53 am

    ‘non fat’ and the results were fattening of my knowledge

    Reply
  177. ferran -  September 23, 2012 - 11:39 am

    l look up the word inconstituicionalicionament end l found only at brasilian dictionary end this means inconstitution.

    Reply
  178. Stacie -  September 23, 2012 - 10:56 am

    “obsidian” I’m an author an needed a better word that just “black”.

    Reply
  179. Sissy -  September 23, 2012 - 10:48 am

    “Dalliance” It was in a book I was reading.

    Reply
  180. bronwyn -  September 23, 2012 - 10:23 am

    I looked up carrion for school work

    Reply
  181. beki -  September 23, 2012 - 10:22 am

    I Looked up synonyms for simple, because i was writing a poem for a competition to win a kindle!

    Reply
  182. Adam -  September 23, 2012 - 10:06 am

    I looked up “acanthous” to make sure it was an authentic word.

    Reply
  183. Sam -  September 23, 2012 - 9:58 am

    I looked up Scarcity for an essay on economics.

    Reply
  184. yvonne -  September 23, 2012 - 9:49 am

    ‘diffident’
    wasn’t sure of the meaning

    Reply
  185. Blue -  September 23, 2012 - 9:07 am

    I looked up “ambivalent” because my favorite actress, Emily Browning, used it in an interview and I wanted to be sure I knew exactly what she was saying. Browning said that she would rather challenge her audience than leave them “ambivalent”.
    Good word Em.

    Reply
  186. Beth -  September 23, 2012 - 8:47 am

    I looked up pickaninny. I have heard it before but wasn’t sure of the meaning. I was reading a story where pickaninny was used towards a small black child. It just caught me off guard.

    Reply
  187. Dave -  September 23, 2012 - 8:40 am

    “Acquire” when writing a note to self. Wasn’t sure there was a c-note in the spelling.

    Reply
  188. Judy -  September 23, 2012 - 7:58 am

    I looked up “swaray”, which I just saw in a book I’m reading (author meant soiree). Thank heaven I didn’t find it until I looked in Urban Dictionary!

    Reply
  189. Scott -  September 23, 2012 - 7:56 am

    I looked up “gadfly”, because I was called that after being purposefully inflammatory in my government class, and I did not know what it meant

    Reply
  190. Laura -  September 23, 2012 - 7:10 am

    hyperbole – this word has been used often in the news, and I wanted to post the definition so that others begin to understand the extent of exaggeration that is going on in today’s political discussions.

    Reply
  191. George -  September 23, 2012 - 6:57 am

    Fickle- My english teacher said i used it incorrectly. ( I didn’t)

    Reply
  192. Brutus Blue -  September 23, 2012 - 5:32 am

    I looked up ‘endue’ to see if I had used it correctly in this sentence: I had to write a 125,000 word story here before I could endue Moran with the chops for poetry.

    Reply
  193. Maggie -  September 23, 2012 - 5:21 am

    We were in a discussion about an article we were reading. We were unsure if the if the writer was correctly using the word banality. When looking it up, we also wanted to listen to the pronunciation of banality and banal. We often hear it mispronounced. Of course Dictionary.com answered all our questions!

    Reply
  194. Dave -  September 23, 2012 - 4:41 am

    I looked up WHINGE while reading the novel Infinite Jest yesterday. The context told me it meant “whine” so I wanted to check spelling, pronunciation and confirm meaning. The word is used mostly by the British and means to complain or grouse, as compared to whine, which is meant to include a higher pitched sound while complaining, etc, like a baby whines, or even any high-pitched noise making thing. Whinge sounds like ‘hinge’. The novel is full of words most readers would not know the meaning of, and it’s an awesome, emotional, meaningful, compassionate word-lover’s and people-lover’s novel. Highly recommended.

    Reply
  195. Nishtha -  September 23, 2012 - 1:23 am

    Also perseverance and straddling for my homework

    Reply
  196. ewa -  September 23, 2012 - 1:18 am

    “Nebulous”. I came across it while reading a book. It went like this: “drawn by a desperate but nebulous need to be useful to the world” .

    Reply
  197. Nishtha -  September 23, 2012 - 1:12 am

    hippopotomonstrosesquippedaliophobia. was trying to remember the spelling.

    Reply
  198. Suzanne Kiraly -  September 23, 2012 - 1:03 am

    Looked up “otiose” – it was part of a headline by one of my favourite journalists and I hadn’t heard it before. It’s a good one to know!

    Reply
  199. Fiona -  September 22, 2012 - 11:23 pm

    I looked up “boomers” because I want to find a word that’s more attractive to describe that generation and then create awareness of the need for these people to become actively involved in government and society, as they are still such a big proportion of the population.

    Reply
  200. Howydowy -  September 22, 2012 - 11:19 pm

    I looked up eunuch cause i didnt know what it meant. I read it in A Game of Thrones.

    Reply
  201. Melson -  September 22, 2012 - 11:09 pm

    Looking up ‘axolotl’. wasn’t sure how to pronounce it… :O

    Reply
  202. Marilyn -  September 22, 2012 - 9:42 pm

    Looked up “wonky” I had used it to describe a piece of equipment at work and wanted to make sure it was the right word ^_^

    Reply
  203. Benjamin Zhang -  September 22, 2012 - 8:35 pm

    I looked up for word “narcissitic” because I had to finish my English Homework on vocabulary

    Reply
  204. Lia -  September 22, 2012 - 8:03 pm

    “Pundit” because everyone keeps referring to them when speaking of politics.
    1.a learned person, expert, or authority.
    2.a person who makes comments or judgments, especially in an authoritative manner; critic or commentator.

    Reply
  205. Lia -  September 22, 2012 - 7:57 pm

    I looked up “beleaguer” which means:
    1. to surround with military forces.
    2.to surround or beset, as with troubles.

    Its been a word I kept encountering so I finally decided to find out its meaning.

    Reply
  206. Matt -  September 22, 2012 - 7:04 pm

    I looked up ‘subrogate’ because my fiancee is studying insurance. Don’t know why it was ME looking it up.. :P

    Reply
  207. Eyewitness -  September 22, 2012 - 6:38 pm

    P.S. Before Dictionary.com, I used to do the same reading for fun using my Webster’s Oxford. Obviously, Dictionary.com is faster, but the hardbound book made it easier to randomize selections–just open on any page. Perhaps Dictionary.com will add a “random entry” utility to the website for entertainment seeking readers such as I. Wikipedia has a “random article” utility embedded in their site, congnzant no doubt that many readers consult Wikipedia without necessarily being motivated to secure specific information. I suspect Dictionary.com might find their readers are also open to this sort of serendipitous “treasure hunting.”

    Reply
  208. Eyewitness -  September 22, 2012 - 6:28 pm

    I look up words for their etymological dictionary entries all the time, as light reading. I recommend it for the sheer fascination. It is wonderfully entertaining. A comprehensive list of linguist abbreviations can be located at Etymonline.com, which is the source for all word origins featured on Dicitonary.com, for example, in case someone does not realize PIE means a proto-indoeuropean “language” root. I think the last entry I randomly looked up for fun was “varsity.”

    Reply
  209. Person -  September 22, 2012 - 6:06 pm

    I looked up the word “ignominy” because I’m studying SAT words. I also learned “pulchritudinous” the other day, and I told my best friend that she was that. It might just be one of my favorite words now. PULCHRITUDINOUS.

    Reply
  210. Aramina Ryoko -  September 22, 2012 - 5:44 pm

    I also looked up antidisestablishmentarianism just because I wanted to be sure I was spelling it right. I was using it for my essay. Did you know that a zedonk is the offspring of a zebra and a donkey?

    Reply
  211. Aramina Ryoko -  September 22, 2012 - 5:40 pm

    I looked up the word mate because, hello, I wanted to find a more respectable word for it.

    Reply
  212. Bob -  September 22, 2012 - 5:15 pm

    Enterprise, I needed help on the apple help site.

    Reply
  213. Rosalie -  September 22, 2012 - 5:12 pm

    Looked up “bedclothes” to prove to a friend that it does not mean “clothes one wears to bed.”

    Reply
  214. jules -  September 22, 2012 - 5:01 pm

    “November” because i wanted to find the root meaning of my birth month

    Reply
  215. ginny -  September 22, 2012 - 4:47 pm

    A better word for bad in an essay I’m writing because I know bad is an overused modifier

    Reply
  216. Linguistics Major -  September 22, 2012 - 4:33 pm

    Just looked up tmesis — checked its derivation. Yup, my guess was correct although this wasn’t a “tuffy”

    Reply
  217. Lina -  September 22, 2012 - 4:33 pm

    Prognostication means forecast or prediction, I already knew that but I needed an antonym for the word but I haven’t found anything.
    :(

    Reply
  218. Lina -  September 22, 2012 - 4:29 pm

    I last looked up prognostication for my vocabulary homework.

    Reply
  219. Anonymous -  September 22, 2012 - 4:27 pm

    I looked up avarice because it was on an English test :P

    Reply
  220. Laura -  September 22, 2012 - 4:18 pm

    looked up three, actually… adhesion, cohesion, and polarity for biology homework!

    Reply
  221. Stephanie♥ -  September 22, 2012 - 2:32 pm

    umm…i dont remember…

    Reply
  222. Autumn -  September 22, 2012 - 2:32 pm

    Militarial. Because everyone uses it, but it’s not technically a real word.

    Reply
  223. anonymous -  September 22, 2012 - 2:19 pm

    Cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine….they used it in a “this is a great word to know”…..say THAT ten times fast!!!

    Reply
  224. Helen Turner -  September 22, 2012 - 2:03 pm

    I looked up the word competently. I am a transcriptionist and I believed the speaker probably had used the correct word; however, I have never heard it so I was not sure if it was really a word.

    Reply
  225. johnb corcoran -  September 22, 2012 - 1:34 pm

    Looked up “inartful”. Couldn’t find it in your dictionary. Mitt Romney and many commentators have been using this word to describe his 47% speech. Why don’t you have this in your dictionary?

    Reply
  226. Sammy -  September 22, 2012 - 12:50 pm

    I looked up electoral college cuz for class we’re doing a project that has to do with the election and you had to find words that are related to the election

    Reply
  227. Alex -  September 22, 2012 - 12:45 pm

    Looked up “satire” because I wanted to make sure I was using it properly in a project.

    Reply
  228. Casey M. -  September 22, 2012 - 12:33 pm

    The last word I looked up was “Gray”, but it was in Thesaurus so I could get some alternatives. The reason I looked it up is because I’m working on a story and gray just isn’t a good word choice for the situation, especially because it isn’t color related.

    Reply
  229. Rolando -  September 22, 2012 - 11:32 am

    I was watching the Big Bang theory and at one point Leonard’s mother asked a question with the word “ersatz” so I looked it up, very interesting. While watching that program, I always end up looking for a word or two.

    Reply
  230. Roxanne -  September 22, 2012 - 11:21 am

    Looked up theoretical and hypothetical because I thought ‘hypothetical’ was better for an ‘unreal’ situation, as in “let us imagine a hypothetical world in which a woman with long blonde vibrissae on her ears and around her wrists and elbows is considered especially pulchritudinous.” I decided on hypothetical.

    Reply
  231. Janny -  September 22, 2012 - 11:18 am

    alloidal

    for work because I didn’t know it meant: free from the tenurial rights of a feudal overlord

    Reply
  232. cam -  September 22, 2012 - 10:46 am

    “Benevolent” because it was in the song “Pushit” by Tool.
    I like the ring of the word, and people say I’m nice (or benevolent), so I also made the lyric (Benevolent sun) my banner on my phone.

    Reply
  233. Azeezah -  September 22, 2012 - 10:20 am

    The comment sending mechanism lagged so I rewrote that last comment(before I saw that the one before that was sent).

    Reply
  234. Azeezah -  September 22, 2012 - 10:16 am

    I looked it up awhile ago because some guy on chess.com called me tenacious when I kept playing even though I was two moves away from losing. I didn’t know what it meant.

    Reply
  235. Azeezah -  September 22, 2012 - 10:12 am

    Some guy on chess.com called me tenacious when I didn’t resign even though I was two moves from losing.

    Reply
  236. Azeezah -  September 22, 2012 - 10:10 am

    I translated a bunch of spanish words today and I remember looking up tenacious.

    Reply
  237. Yarnovah -  September 22, 2012 - 9:55 am

    I looked up “posthoumus”, because my husband used it. I thought he pronounced it incorrectly. I was right! (hah!)

    Reply
  238. Parf -  September 22, 2012 - 9:46 am

    Clod. I was looking for a very harsh synonym for Idiot for the book I’m writing, but could not find a good one c:…

    Reply
  239. Evie -  September 22, 2012 - 9:35 am

    I just looked up “compendium” to see if I was using it correctly in a conference paper I’m writing. (I wasn’t!) Always pays to double-check…

    Reply
  240. JC -  September 22, 2012 - 8:52 am

    I last looked up “harass” because I wanted a good synonym for the IMDb character profile I’m typing. In addition to searching for this, I was drinking a hot cup of English tea.

    Reply
  241. AnimeFreak75 -  September 22, 2012 - 8:51 am

    i last looked up “antique” because i really am a bad speller

    Reply
  242. Kate -  September 22, 2012 - 8:13 am

    I looked up “slipshop” because it was used in an article, and I’d never seen it before. But as I suspected, there’s no such word. The author really meant “slipshod.” It was also interesting to learn that the term derives from loose or ill-fitting shoes.

    Reply
  243. jodie -  September 22, 2012 - 7:58 am

    Looked up infidel because it was the word to log onto a computer.
    I always thought it had a negative connotation like dirty or squalor,
    but what does it really mean?

    Reply
  244. Ted Hartley -  September 22, 2012 - 7:33 am

    haiku as in MOONLIGHT IN VERMONT….lovely discovery

    Reply
  245. Terry -  September 22, 2012 - 7:22 am

    “apathy” because I wish to be apathetic

    Reply
  246. Bruno -  September 22, 2012 - 7:09 am

    I looked up the word: twitterpated

    A new word to express my love to my wife.

    Reply
  247. DingoDad -  September 22, 2012 - 6:37 am

    Looked up “dynamo”. My son has his first soccer game today and his team name is “Dynamos”, and he wanted to know what a dynamo was. I wanted to make sure I had the exact definition. He really truelly is one.

    Reply
  248. Tony -  September 22, 2012 - 6:11 am

    Dactylic, Iambic, and Trochaic because I wanted to understand their meaning and impact on hymn tunes.

    Reply
  249. Andrew Adelard Girard jr -  September 22, 2012 - 4:47 am

    Magnamatic?

    Reply
  250. Dianna -  September 22, 2012 - 2:52 am

    “personickty”
    i come across in Modern Family i’m not sure if it is right writing

    Reply
  251. Bryan -  September 22, 2012 - 2:39 am

    I looked up CLAVE as a noun, since it was used in Cassandra Clare’s “City of Bones” as a term for a governing body, a use I’d also seen in Stephen Donaldson’s “Second Chronicles of Thomas Covenant”. Unfortunately, the only meaning for CLAVE (noun) I could find was a musical instrument. I’m left wondering if it was a usage invented by the authors — presumably related to CONCLAVE — or if there is some previous precedent for that meaning that hasn’t made it into the dictionaries.

    Reply
  252. doctorwho8 -  September 22, 2012 - 1:43 am

    I looked up why, it, you and a because it was wondering the exact definitions, we use them like all the time but it is hard to give a definition to what they mean

    Reply
  253. Holly -  September 22, 2012 - 12:46 am

    I looked up ‘germane’ because it appeared in the transcript of court proceedings in relation to a case I have to write an essay on.

    Reply
  254. Word-Geek -  September 21, 2012 - 11:52 pm

    “Forswear” — just to verify the meaning after reading it in the scriptures.

    Reply
  255. Hannah -  September 21, 2012 - 10:53 pm

    I looked up the word precious because i had already used the word like 5 times in my essay and i wanted to use it again but not the exact same word :p

    Reply
  256. Joseph Reilly -  September 21, 2012 - 10:23 pm

    I looked up effulgence subsequent to seeing it used to describe the mammaries of Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge.

    Reply
  257. Jericho -  September 21, 2012 - 9:56 pm

    I looked up “caustic” because of the Caustic Goliath in Borderlands 2.

    Reply
  258. Sara -  September 21, 2012 - 9:13 pm

    I looked up, “Directioner”, which was not in this dictionary by the way. I wanted to see if it was. It should be.

    Reply
  259. BahElim -  September 21, 2012 - 7:11 pm

    “Hic”–its various uses.
    The result I got?
    No results found for hic:
    Did you mean chic
    That ain’t really chic, ain’t it? A site like this ought to have such an entry.

    Reply
  260. Angelica -  September 21, 2012 - 6:35 pm

    I looked up pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis because; (1) I wanted to see if I could spell it and (2) I wanted to say it, which I can!

    Reply
  261. Roxas -  September 21, 2012 - 5:25 pm

    i looked up ‘wit’ because my french project…. o_O

    Reply
  262. Andrew -  September 21, 2012 - 4:18 pm

    “concupiscent” as in, “In kitchen cups concupiscent curds” from Emperor of Ice-Cream by Wallace Stevens. So concupiscent curds would be ice cream :)

    Reply
  263. Joe'l -  September 21, 2012 - 4:14 pm

    I looked up “punt”, because my son and husband were trying to explain something to me about football and what the punter did. I said, “Oh, the kicker”. The boys said no, the punter. I said punting was kicking. They said it’s not the same. I said maybe not the same people making the same plays, but still kicking. They said no, it wasn’t the same as a kick. We came to the same conclusion, that we often come to in our house. Look it up.
    I was right.

    Reply
  264. Dante -  September 21, 2012 - 4:13 pm

    For all you new fans of pulchritudinous, you might want to try out my personal favorite word: callipygian.

    Reply
  265. Dieter Haag -  September 21, 2012 - 4:08 pm

    To George Adams:There is a difference in meaning between “shrank”and “shrunk”:Shrank means I made something become smaller, ex.: I shrank my sweater. Shrunk, on the other hand means that something became smaller, ex.: My sweater shrunk by two sizes,

    Reply
  266. Nathanial H. -  September 21, 2012 - 2:36 pm

    I looked up Lamprophony, to prove it’s a real word for a scrabble game (we use Dictionary.com for our scrabble dictionary :P)

    Reply
  267. Hawkess -  September 21, 2012 - 2:29 pm

    i looked up “vibrissae” because a few weeks back i was looking at an article about cats and the word was there

    Reply
  268. Happy Camper -  September 21, 2012 - 2:12 pm

    The last definition I read was strepitous which was the word of the day. Good thing too, I thought it meant the opposite of what it actually does. The last word I looked up on my own was proclivity because the spell check on my phone didn’t recognize it and I wanted to make sure I was spelling and using it correctly

    Reply
  269. Ron Wild -  September 21, 2012 - 1:51 pm

    I looked up Parapet to see if it was the correct word for a low wall along a river bank, or just best used to describe a low wall of a bridge.

    Reply
  270. Me -  September 21, 2012 - 1:32 pm

    Pulchritudinous, just curious, and then many of the other words people were posting, just curious and to be a little recursive. I appreciated the tone of hippopotomonstrosesquippedaliophobia.

    Reply
  271. Aj -  September 21, 2012 - 1:21 pm

    I looked up the meaning of edification after reading a passage in the Holy Bible to understand a passage that was allowing me to reflect on the nature of my life. Thanks dictionary.reference.com

    Reply
  272. Stephen Meek -  September 21, 2012 - 12:49 pm

    Congenial – I was just curious as to what it meant because the word popped into my mind.

    Reply
  273. Monica -  September 21, 2012 - 12:33 pm

    I looked up empirical. I’m glad I did, because I was about to mis-use it in a grant report!

    Reply
  274. Sean Cannon -  September 21, 2012 - 12:10 pm

    Sleight. To find out whether I can use it without “of hand” and to determine the pronunciation – ‘slite’ or ‘slate’.

    Reply
  275. Ray -  September 21, 2012 - 12:00 pm

    And here’s another paradigm-instance of why I search the dictionary–

    I’m editing a sentence from the story of Atlantis describing that there was a mountain of moderate height, that sank with the island,- and for context I’m inserting a reference to a potential search by deep-sea submersible… And, the point I wish to state is that the mountain can be found-by-detection, but I’m not addressing the issue of the exactness of its description: rather, that undersea mountains are or can be “detectible,” whether or not “detectably” the one in question: I’m referring to a minor tangibility rather than the major affirmation… as I’m linguistically nudging the two toward co-consideration…

    Sounds pedantic, but it’s enough to distinguish, detectible from detectable.

    Reply
  276. Oklahoma -  September 21, 2012 - 11:34 am

    I looked up “platypus” just now to see the plural, because I was imagining myself living in Australia and being an “aussie” and watching platypuses swim outside my window. Now I know: It’s platypuses, or platypi. Like cacti!

    Reply
  277. Adam -  September 21, 2012 - 11:19 am

    I looked up “bum” to learn about its origins.
    Here is why.
    A taxi driver in Poland (I am Polish and live in Poland) told me a story using this word as if it were a regular Polish noun (pronounced “boom”, singular spelled the same as in English, plural “bumy”) meaning a homeless person. I asked several Poles, rather well educated ones, if they knew such a word in Polish – no one did. Neither did I, and in fact I was able to understand what the taxi driver meant only thanks to knowing the English word “bum”. That made me wonder about the origins of this word. Before checking in Dictionary.com I thought about a possible connection with the German verb “bummeln”, but the entry I found did not confirm that.

    Reply
  278. SammyB -  September 21, 2012 - 10:56 am

    Disbursement. Because I can never remember the difference between Dispersement and Disbursement.

    Reply
  279. Finn -  September 21, 2012 - 10:54 am

    I looked up the word ‘proxy’ while reading an article in Crain’s Business about ITW (Illinois Tool Works) divesting/selling off some of their business interests.

    Reply
  280. Paula -  September 21, 2012 - 10:54 am

    Puissant, because it was in a book I was reading and I wasn’t sure of the definition.

    Reply
  281. Colby -  September 21, 2012 - 10:45 am

    Determinate. Because I watched a Disney channel movie last night, and even though I know what the word determine means, the word determinate has more of a determined definition.

    Reply
  282. Ole TBoy -  September 21, 2012 - 10:06 am

    Lubricious, because it just came out of my mouth as I was babbling as a form of self entertainment. I thought, “That’s not just babble. That really is a word. Wonder what it means.”

    Reply
  283. Josh -  September 21, 2012 - 9:54 am

    I looked up Ancillary, I found it on an official document and wanted to use it, so I made sure of its definition

    Reply
  284. Bianca and Maddy -  September 21, 2012 - 9:41 am

    PULCHRITUDINOUS BECAUSE WE ARE BEAUTIFUL AND LUSCIOUS.

    Reply
  285. jonsid -  September 21, 2012 - 9:31 am

    Looked up “faith”. Faith: Strong or unshakeable belief in something especially without proof or evidence.
    Then looked up “faithless” which should mean a person who holds beliefs based on facts, proof or evidence. Instead the definition comes up:

    Faithless: unreliable, untrustworthy, treacherous, disloyal, dishonest.

    Huh?

    Reply
  286. max -  September 21, 2012 - 9:23 am

    Looked up “berry” because my son was wondering if grapes are considered berries. They are.

    Reply
  287. LukeJavan -  September 21, 2012 - 8:55 am

    Looked up
    flaucinaucinihilipilification
    because I could not believe it was a real word.

    Reply
  288. Sarah Neubert -  September 21, 2012 - 8:53 am

    I lastly looked up the word decorous.
    My friend wanted me to help her think of adjectives that described her for a college application. It was a spawn of the word mannerly, which I had looked up prior to decorous.

    Reply
  289. Anonymous -  September 21, 2012 - 8:37 am

    I looked up “hallucination” because I sometimes get things like that. I found that I sometimes get types of “auditory hallucinations”, “musical hallucinations” and “tactile hallucinations” but I’m not sick or anything. *shrugs* I usually just forget about it.

    Reply
  290. Shenandoah Walker -  September 21, 2012 - 8:17 am

    Prodigal – a word used in one context it seems, and yet few of us remember the meaning. I was surprised to see its main idea is “wasteful”. The Latin root idea is especially helpful, to “drive away”. This helped prepare me to explain it to others.

    Reply
  291. Joy -  September 21, 2012 - 8:14 am

    I just looked up “buccaneer”, because that word appeared on a comic I was reading, and to understand the story, I looked the word up. It means “pirate” or “any pirate.”

    Reply
  292. johnny -  September 21, 2012 - 7:59 am

    i looked up ‘risible ‘ means laughable. It was in a book i’m reading “the big short “

    Reply
  293. Sarah -  September 21, 2012 - 7:36 am

    Nadir as the last word I looked up.

    Reply
  294. Anne -  September 21, 2012 - 7:02 am

    I looked up “blow” because I had told one of my first-year college students that his writing was overblown. That got me to thinking about the origin of overblown, and I decided it must be related to the Middle English meaning of “blow” as “bloom” (see “Sumer is icumin in”) and I was curious to see if you had that meaning of “blow.” You did, as a fourth (archaic) meaning. If a flower has “blown,” it has bloomed; overblown is past its prime, too much of a good thing, excessive–just like his writing. When I explained that, he liked it. :-)

    Reply
  295. Max -  September 21, 2012 - 6:54 am

    Looked up and saw the ceiling

    Reply
  296. Dene Hawkins -  September 21, 2012 - 6:51 am

    I looked up “moot” after once again hearing a coworker pronounce it with a long “u” sound. I thought that perhaps I had been pronouncing it incorrectly all these years.

    Reply
  297. Ray -  September 21, 2012 - 6:51 am

    But just to append a favorite from years ago–

    I’d tried to find the word, ‘detilierated’, that I’d thought I’d remembered from a museum visit decades ago in France, describing an artist technique of laying strips of cut varnish atop a woodsy scene to simulate a shadowied sunlight… Artists of a epoch can be talented, even clever, using the available materiels and contemporary techniques of their more mundane worker-class (artisan) brethren, ofttimes as one-shot (never-repeated) musings– leaving scholarly-pursuited academicians scurrying for the right word to designate the method; Artists straddle the deemed division between mundane and erudite worlds….

    Reply
  298. Douglas -  September 21, 2012 - 6:44 am

    I looked for the word “writhe” because it was in a text I was translating to portuguese and I needed to know all the acceptions the word has to choose the one fitted best in text I was working on.

    Reply
  299. Miranda -  September 21, 2012 - 6:24 am

    I looked up ‘masochist’ because I was described as such.

    Reply
  300. Patrick Oliver -  September 21, 2012 - 6:19 am

    I just looked up abdication online.

    Reply
  301. Ray -  September 21, 2012 - 6:17 am

    ‘TERPOLATE – I needed a word that expressed the compound sense of both extrapolate, and, interpolate, as what I was labeling was not properly either… (The more exacting explanation is that I was constructing a color image from a triplet of NASA Mars rover images of the same scene taken in three filters, L2, L5, L7, that are narrowband, 20-32 nm spectral width, whence the scene could-not-be the real, color but… ‘terpolated… I settled on this abbreviation).

    Reply
  302. jpg -  September 21, 2012 - 5:54 am

    ‘scuppernong’, a muscadine grape, because my english prof brother posted it on his facebook page

    Reply
  303. David -  September 21, 2012 - 5:43 am

    I looked up variations of the word forgiveness. I had just woken up with a small riot happening in my stomach after spending a dream searching for a word. In the dream, I was looking for a word that described the alternative to seeking justice: a state of not seeking social or physical compensation for wrongs done against oneself. I ended up thinking of mercy, but I could have sworn another word existed that was small and sweet like mercy – but different. So I decided to look up the forgiveness to find out, only to find that mercy was the word I was looking for in my dream the whole time. Now if only I had an internet webpage I could go to that would relieve this horrid indigestion! I’m certain you’re working on that next, however.

    Reply
  304. David -  September 21, 2012 - 5:42 am

    The accompanying photo ( the letter B cut out to find a letter heading like in a dictionary or encyclopedia) is a negative. It is backward for some reason… Can you tell?

    Reply
  305. Manoman -  September 21, 2012 - 5:19 am

    I was looking a synonym of “helpless” in the thesaurus and found “incapacity” for a song lyric I’m writing

    Reply
  306. Michael -  September 21, 2012 - 5:19 am

    Looked up ensure/insure after read through a trust agreement. I thought the attorney made a mistake.

    Reply
  307. rowaidha essop -  September 21, 2012 - 5:02 am

    Hi ! I looked up the word notornis mantelli -crossword addict

    Reply
  308. Shannon -  September 21, 2012 - 4:56 am

    I looked up “sordid.” I had only ever heard it used as a synonym for “vile” but I saw it used as a descriptive adjective for a color. I know now it also means “dirty.”

    Reply
  309. ^_+ -  September 21, 2012 - 4:47 am

    i looked up “contarded” because a boy said his neck felt that way

    Reply
  310. Jewel -  September 21, 2012 - 3:39 am

    I looked up soiree because someone invited me to an art soiree. I wanted to be sure of what it actually means. Is it for all kinds of art or specifically to music.

    Reply
  311. Al -  September 21, 2012 - 2:52 am

    I looked up polymath to be sure of the meaning for a poem I was writitng

    Reply
  312. menme -  September 21, 2012 - 1:57 am

    Looked up “chiaroscuro” and “sfumato” because I’m writing a time-travel story involving Leonardo da Vinci and I wondered if I could use these words to describe a real face as opposed to a painting

    Reply
  313. Grane -  September 21, 2012 - 1:44 am

    I looked up “karanas”, “tithis” and “mecum” and was unsuccessful in finding a definition. All words were found in books that I have read. I am still none the wiser!

    Reply
  314. Teitur -  September 21, 2012 - 1:24 am

    I looked up Ubiquitous, Simply because, I was curious.

    Reply
  315. bleh -  September 20, 2012 - 11:07 pm

    “albeit”, just so i could make sure i was using it right in a school paper.

    Reply
  316. sesquipedalian :) -  September 20, 2012 - 9:53 pm

    I totally just looked up pulchritudinous.

    Reply
  317. Jennifer B. / Brooklyn -  September 20, 2012 - 8:35 pm

    Alembicated. I heard George, the chauffeur in a Mrs. Bradley mystery, use it to describe his daughter’s fiance.

    Reply
  318. 13YO -  September 20, 2012 - 7:41 pm

    I searched “stenchful” because my eighth grade English teacher denied that it was a word. He was wrong.

    Reply
  319. lori -  September 20, 2012 - 7:39 pm

    Woah – why do people spell it that way, it’s whoa.

    Reply
  320. Lolli -  September 20, 2012 - 7:13 pm

    I looked up filibuster. Bill O’Reilly called Barnie Frank a filibuster and it seemed to me he was using it incorrectly. Possibly his was speaking historically.

    Reply
  321. Kiseki -  September 20, 2012 - 6:29 pm

    Hematemesis……. ^^;

    Reply
  322. Kate -  September 20, 2012 - 6:14 pm

    “Aesthetic.” I am analyzing “Ode on a Grecian Urn” by John Keats. My teacher said “Explain what gives the poem its aesthetic beauty.”

    Reply
  323. Grant -  September 20, 2012 - 6:09 pm

    looked up trivial i was doing homework

    Reply
  324. Kori -  September 20, 2012 - 6:06 pm

    I looked up ” adaptations” for my seventh grade science homework

    Reply
  325. HDA6 -  September 20, 2012 - 5:57 pm

    spectrometer

    Reply
  326. Lauren -  September 20, 2012 - 5:55 pm

    I looked up pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis because i needed to find a word longer than 25 letters for school. (It’s a lung disease caused by silica dust, if anybody was wondering)

    Reply
  327. RobAtl -  September 20, 2012 - 5:55 pm

    I heard “the city of Richmond was begirt with bodies” on a Civil War documentary, so I looked up “begirt.” It means surrounded, and is related to gird, girdle, and girth.

    Reply
  328. Yukon Jack -  September 20, 2012 - 5:51 pm

    tarbaby…was surprised…:(

    Reply
  329. Yukon Jack -  September 20, 2012 - 5:48 pm

    lutherie…the local bookstore monkey said, “wha?”

    Reply
  330. madeleine -  September 20, 2012 - 5:42 pm

    impecunious for a worksheet on latin derivatives

    Reply
  331. meh!!!!! -  September 20, 2012 - 5:38 pm

    i looked up Dependent Variable for science class… we are going through scientific method and stuff like that

    Reply
  332. Mia -  September 20, 2012 - 5:34 pm

    @SlenderMan
    Your name is what my worst nightmare is. I know my name means Missing In Action. My last word was Cara because I read it in “Gangster At The Grand Atlantic” because it is my homework.

    Reply
  333. ss -  September 20, 2012 - 5:14 pm

    conform
    Hw

    Reply
  334. withoutthetitle -  September 20, 2012 - 5:01 pm

    I looked up the etymology of “universe” because i was looking for a better title to use for one of my diddys and was tickled at the earliest Latin and Greek origins.

    Reply
  335. Abby -  September 20, 2012 - 4:57 pm

    Inappropriate

    homework

    Reply
  336. Sophie -  September 20, 2012 - 4:47 pm

    looked up the word “commercial” to find a different word for it, using it on a homework writing assignment for english class

    Reply
  337. Stacy -  September 20, 2012 - 4:44 pm

    I looked up “unhelpful” in the thesaurus, because my character was not being helped by another. That didn’t do it for me, so I looked up “merciless” instead. Then I realized that the other character was not refusing to help for a lack of mercy, but because he was simply “frustrated” with her. One word just leads to another.

    Reply
  338. Valerie -  September 20, 2012 - 4:44 pm

    One of my friends were joking with me in class and then called me a fuddyduddy! I looked it up when I got home. I was a bit shocked by what it meant (b/c I didn’t think expect it meant that), but now I use it to tease my little sis. :)

    Reply
  339. Ben -  September 20, 2012 - 4:30 pm

    I looked up leadership to look for a name for a make believe presidential campaign. But i havent found one. Can anyone help? (not republican or democrat or anything already used)

    Reply
  340. alex -  September 20, 2012 - 4:26 pm

    I looked up barley/barely because i was doing a writing assignment and i didnt know which word was barely!! :S

    Reply
  341. riley:)) -  September 20, 2012 - 4:15 pm

    hahahah i looked up ‘asinine’ because one of my teachers told me “do not ask me any more asinine questions or you will have a silent lunch” asinine means silly :)

    Reply
  342. Amaryllis -  September 20, 2012 - 4:13 pm

    I looked up synonyms for ‘venereal’, because I’m writing a novel set in the 18th century. Although the word is used very often in original 18th century texts to refer to the erotic and sexual, I felt that readers would be distracted by its modern link with disease. I was so attached to this word, however, that I couldn’t think of any alternative, and turned to Thesaurus.com (where I spend half my time anyway, just browsing). I was searching for a word that was authentic (in my novel I’m not using any word that appeared after 1780 – I check the etymology of everything) and had the flavour of the 18th century. I settled on ‘licentious’.

    Reply
  343. Slenderman -  September 20, 2012 - 3:42 pm

    I looked up what my name meant.

    Reply
  344. Danielle -  September 20, 2012 - 3:41 pm

    I looked up “Bohemian” because my sister, mom, and I are all reading My Antonia by Willa Cather. In the book, the character Antonia and her family are referred to as Bohemians.

    Reply
  345. Kaye -  September 20, 2012 - 3:34 pm

    Garderobes. I was reading a Scottish novel, and was like “WUT.” Haha. :D

    Reply
  346. MsWormwood -  September 20, 2012 - 3:20 pm

    I looked up “puce” because I was reading a Georgian period novel and it was used as the color of a coat, but later in the book someone is described as “puce in the face.” It’s reddish brown which sounds OK for a coat but not so great as a facial expression.

    Reply
  347. Storm -  September 20, 2012 - 3:14 pm

    Looked up “Deoxyribonucleic acid” because i knew the meaning but nobody believed me

    Reply
  348. LOOK-UP | BLOGCHI@mayopia.com -  September 20, 2012 - 3:02 pm

    [...] “LOOK UP” In the Sky — Though the longer Frank Zappa version might offend some, — Freedom without coercion — A Morsel or dim sum. — It’s more Corporate than Country: — The Military Industrial Complex. — Do we see Golden arches? — Floored is the last word linked currently within — To Subliminal Religiosity forced marches. — Wall Street effrontery  — Spicy Tex-Mex. — Links enure/inure of wordy Wanderlust. – A simple treat or libation or caudle, — Not another Monkey; — We have no time to Dawdle. — It could be a Bird or a Plane or another Falling Star  to Cache or Super Pup — Ya never really know what anything actually means, — Whether Living on Sponge cake or food for thought and rice and beans, — Unless Oui occasionally ‘Look-Up’ — ‘Look-up’. –>>L.T.Rhyme [...]

    Reply
  349. Cel -  September 20, 2012 - 2:37 pm

    I looked up “pugilistic” because I heard it used in AMC’s Hell on Wheels and didn’t know what it meant! :)

    Reply
  350. Michelle -  September 20, 2012 - 2:34 pm

    obsequious

    Reply
  351. Alex -  September 20, 2012 - 2:12 pm

    Looked up “narcissistic” for a report. Didn’t know how to spell it >.<

    Reply
  352. goodwin -  September 20, 2012 - 1:15 pm

    futz, it is up there and I have no idea what it means.

    Reply
  353. Dan J. -  September 20, 2012 - 12:47 pm

    I looked up “pernicious” because the way I’ve heard it used lately, I had begun to doubt my understanding of its correct definition. It turned out — astoundingly — that I was right.

    Reply
  354. Tecumseh -  September 20, 2012 - 12:41 pm

    lenticular – convex in form, or resembling the shape of a lentil seed.

    Researching the best way to describe a bifacially reduced stone tool in a pre-form or laurel leaf pattern.

    Reply
  355. Ed -  September 20, 2012 - 12:22 pm

    I stopped what I was doing to look up the word “shugyo” — and it turns out that it’s not even American nor English. It’s actually a Japanese word, which (broadly defined) means “advanced study” — but more specifically, it is training to push beyond your limits. It is as much psychological as it is physical. The idea is that the student must push him or herself to exhaustion, and then find the determination to go beyond. I suppose that if the candidate does not have the determination to push his limits he does not have sufficient determination to become a black belt.

    Reply
  356. Capthaeth -  September 20, 2012 - 12:20 pm

    Looked up “fascism” and “chauvinism” because I had a suspicion that people were not using it the way they thought they were.

    Reply
  357. Alex -  September 20, 2012 - 12:15 pm

    I looked up synonyms for ‘skills’ to help with writing my personal statement.

    Reply
  358. Brianna -  September 20, 2012 - 12:05 pm

    I looked up “gules” because i was reading The Scarlet Letter and had no idea what it ment.

    Reply
  359. Gary -  September 20, 2012 - 12:01 pm

    I looked up pedantic as I never wish to be. I had to look up Pulchritudinous. No worries, I am not. I also used the Thesaurus to find different ways of expressing Confidence.

    Reply
  360. genger -  September 20, 2012 - 11:47 am

    Abiotic (environment) to help explain ecosystems to my High School age brother struggling in biology.

    Reply
  361. Devin -  September 20, 2012 - 11:31 am

    Paucity: A man interviewing Ernest Hemingway used it to describe the author’s use of punctuation. It means “scarcity”.

    Reply
  362. Nick -  September 20, 2012 - 11:19 am

    I looked up gratitude. I wanted to be sure I was using it in correct context for my scholarship thank you letter.

    Reply
  363. Just Tess -  September 20, 2012 - 11:15 am

    abominable because I’ve only ever heard it used in relation to snowmen and thought it might mean something along the lines of “alive” – I was not right!

    Reply
  364. T.R. Dailey -  September 20, 2012 - 11:10 am

    “Lugubriously” – It’s written in a book I recently finished writing and during review of my work I realized that I didn’t know what it meant off the top of my head! It means mournful or gloomy in an exaggerated manner. I left it in the book ;)

    Reply
  365. Alan -  September 20, 2012 - 10:46 am

    hircine – to use it as a secret word when a coworker has a dumb idea, as in that idea is hircine.

    Reply
  366. Dieter Simon -  September 20, 2012 - 10:43 am

    Petrichor: after the drought of a lon hot summer, the first rain. That lovely scent rising from the ground. I have always wondered what it was called

    Reply
  367. Giratina -  September 20, 2012 - 10:30 am

    I looked up adjectives because I forgot what it meant for a while

    Reply
  368. Jeanne -  September 20, 2012 - 10:21 am

    “Ontologically”, a word in a theology class of mine.

    Reply
  369. hksche2000 -  September 20, 2012 - 10:11 am

    If Latin and Greek were still taught today, most of the words mentioned above wouldn’t have needed to be looked up.

    Pulch-er, -ra, -rum in Latin means pretty, pulchritud-o, -inis = beauty.
    Don’t think “puchritudin-us” even exists in the Classic Latin dictionary. Hence, “pulchritudinous” properly derived should be “pulchrious”, instead. But then again, a pulchrious girl would sound only half as pretty as a pulchritudinous girl, wouldn’t it?!

    Reply
  370. Catherine Scott -  September 20, 2012 - 10:11 am

    Chartreuse. A co worker had a lovely top and scarf, and we wanted to get the color right. So it was.

    Reply
  371. Andrea -  September 20, 2012 - 10:03 am

    Looked up administrate because I thought it was an incorrect or less common version of “administer.” Turns out it was just less common.

    Reply
  372. tim -  September 20, 2012 - 9:11 am

    Beard-because it was used as a verb-wow I never knew that one-Thanks Jack London!

    Reply
  373. Rick -  September 20, 2012 - 9:00 am

    Just looked up hustings during this political time. For some unknown reason I had pictured it as meaning “going out to the farm areas looking for the rural votes, even standing in a corn field with your message”.
    What an imagination ignorance can cultivate.

    Reply
  374. bholland -  September 20, 2012 - 8:57 am

    “Dilemma” always gives me a problem with the spelling – for some reason I always want to put an “n” in it: “dilemna.” Now it looks ridiculous.

    Reply
  375. George Adams -  September 20, 2012 - 8:49 am

    @AG: The pronunciation of “content” varies according to its use.
    As a noun, it’s pronounced “KON-tent”. As an adjective, it’s pronounced “kun-TENT”.

    Reply
  376. George Adams -  September 20, 2012 - 8:44 am

    I looked up “shrink” to determine if “shrunk” was an acceptable past tense form. It is, but I’m going to stick with “shrank” anyway!

    Reply
  377. Arianna -  September 20, 2012 - 8:30 am

    incendiary

    I wanted to be sure I could use it as a noun on Twitter in relation to the cartoons of Muhammad published this week in France.

    Reply
  378. khabeer -  September 20, 2012 - 8:30 am

    I looked “lollapalooza” As once i learned it, I was making myself sure whether it actually is a word or I have invent it myself ;)

    Reply
  379. Patrick -  September 20, 2012 - 8:28 am

    Looked up tropology. Read of it in a hermeneutics book I am reading. A Pastor on the radio offered an interpretation of verses in Genesis 3 that were a little “out there” and he was executing a tropological reading of Scripture.

    Reply
  380. mary -  September 20, 2012 - 8:26 am

    aggravation. I didn’t know how to spell it:)

    Reply
  381. Mary Ann -  September 20, 2012 - 8:22 am

    I looked up the word “up”, because it is frustrating my foreign exchange students. It is still frustrating my students, but I’m on their side!

    Reply
  382. Bubba -  September 20, 2012 - 8:17 am

    Well, I just Had to look up Puchritudinous seeing as how it’s so popular in todays comments. Surprise! Who’d a thukitt? Some times I can infer a words meaning by its context. Sometimes just by the sound you can get the drift. The very sound of this word makes me think that it’s derogatory. Makes me think – loose morals, sneaky, underhanded, unsavory at the least. But nooo…!
    Lots of other words are very misleading to a person using context as a guide. Firmament, as used in the Christian?/Jewish? holy book is means the Air! It isn’t firm/does not conform/must be old/it ain’t the norm.

    Reply
  383. jessii -  September 20, 2012 - 8:14 am

    intimacy

    Reply
  384. Robin -  September 20, 2012 - 7:55 am

    Looked up the word ‘suppressed’ as wasn’t certain whether it was spelt with one s or two – and didn’t want to look like an idiot if I got it wrong

    Reply
  385. Bubba -  September 20, 2012 - 7:52 am

    To the Editors : When I reference a word at Dicdotcom there is that neat audio pronuciation thingie. Really cool. Especially for E.S.L. people. I was disappointed when I subscribed to Spanish Word of the Day and it wasn’t there. Pronunciation clues are especially important when studying a new language. How about including it with the English version too? Also, how about a spellcheck thingum for this comment panel? Reading some of this stuff is downright PAINFULL!… After all, isn’t this website for the edification and enlightenment of the legions of us who have suffered at the gentle ministrations of our public education system?

    Reply
  386. stranger101 -  September 20, 2012 - 7:52 am

    i looked my last word up for hw purposes. duh! what a weird question!

    Reply
  387. Greg Coker -  September 20, 2012 - 7:47 am

    I looked up xanthomas because I wanted to know how it is pronounced.

    Reply
  388. Bubba -  September 20, 2012 - 7:22 am

    SCROFULOUS… I was looking for a especially insulting adjective to use on a particularly unsavary character I have the misfortune to know. I will often look up a word to discover its origins and roots. Also am very fond of adjectives (discriptive words). Most insults and invective are so banal and over used so as to become meaningless. When I insult someone I don’t want to JUST hurt their feelings, I want to wound. I want that they need professional help. I want that they need therapy!

    Reply
  389. jim -  September 20, 2012 - 7:18 am

    I looked up liquefy because it is not liquify like most people think. Even English professors get this one wrong. Check it out for yourself!

    Reply
  390. sassykins -  September 20, 2012 - 7:10 am

    I looked up “ubiquitous” while doing a jigsaw puzzle on jigidi.com. It was used to describe a picture of a tree trunk as “having a unique pattern that is ubiquitous”.

    Reply
  391. Anthony -  September 20, 2012 - 7:09 am

    I looked up “propaganda” because a coworker of mine used it to describe the movie “The Lorax”, resulting in a discussion of the meaning of the term and its possible distinction from simply “art with a message with which you personally disagree”. I wanted to see the proper official definition.

    Reply
  392. tresakon -  September 20, 2012 - 7:06 am

    I looked up litigious because I live in Ecuador and it is NOT a litigious society. Therefore, we are able have exercise equipment, monkey bars, merry-go-rounds, ziplines, and swing sets in our parks without the fear of someone suing!!! I love it!!!!
    .

    Reply
  393. Dante -  September 20, 2012 - 6:57 am

    I looked up heterodoxy. A coworker and I were, well, bloviating, via email and I told him I didn’t want to be accused of apostasy for taking a particular action. He suggested perhaps I had meant heterodoxy.

    Reply
  394. Mike D -  September 20, 2012 - 6:54 am

    Antidisestablishmentarianism isn’t the longest word.

    Pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis is (as far as I know). It refers to a lung disease caused by the inhalation of very fine silicas dust – like from a volcanic eruption – causing inflammation of the lungs.

    Reply
  395. jim -  September 20, 2012 - 6:52 am

    I looked up anamorphosis because of a sculptor that uses this process in producing his representations of the human form.

    Reply
  396. Ellie -  September 20, 2012 - 6:49 am

    Schizophrenia to A. make sure I spelled it right and B. Because I am a teen who is interested in mental illness

    Reply
  397. Victoria -  September 20, 2012 - 6:42 am

    Recursion. I wanted to know variants of the word so I could think of a clever scientific themed answer for “What will you be for Halloween?”. I didn’t use the word after all, I used Fibonacci, but it is good to know how to use recursive in different ways. That is, so to say, being able to use the word recursive in different ways is a good thing to know.

    Reply
  398. Marjan -  September 20, 2012 - 6:37 am

    I looked up ‘rhyme’ as it was on your site and I wanted to know its exact meaning.

    Reply
  399. Sunny -  September 20, 2012 - 6:27 am

    toile – someone at work was wearing a shirt that reminded me of this kind of fabric and I couldn’t remember the name. It’s fabric with a pale background and scenes painted on it. Reminds me of the 18th century. Going to look up Pulchritudinous now.

    Reply
  400. Dicky -  September 20, 2012 - 6:25 am

    Looked up “eerie” to see if there really was a county by that name.

    Reply
  401. Alexandria -  September 20, 2012 - 6:21 am

    Diagnostic- For an assignment at school.

    Reply
  402. Zeke -  September 20, 2012 - 6:17 am

    I looked up “defenestration”…because I did not believe there was actually a word for the action it describes…It is the act of throwing someone or something out of a window!

    Reply
  403. Anna -  September 20, 2012 - 6:06 am

    I looked up hippopotomonstrosesquippedaliophobia for school

    Reply
  404. Kate -  September 20, 2012 - 6:04 am

    “Ethos” for a homework assignment.

    Reply
  405. Yankiemog -  September 20, 2012 - 6:01 am

    I looked up conjunction because I am one of the few people who knows what it is and when to use it

    Reply
  406. Jessica -  September 20, 2012 - 5:44 am

    “dehiscence” as in wound dehiscence. Because I had to write in a letter to a doctor.

    Reply
  407. T-T -  September 20, 2012 - 5:42 am

    I looked up “scobidaily” because my girlfriend yelled it at me

    Reply
  408. Sandi -  September 20, 2012 - 5:40 am

    Someone told me I am perspicacious, and I wanted to be certain I knew what the word means.

    Reply
  409. John -  September 20, 2012 - 5:35 am

    Reading a opinion by Pat Buchanan, Torquemada was referanced I needed to know more.

    Reply
  410. mike H -  September 20, 2012 - 5:35 am

    “ampersand” in order to prove to my 18 year old daughter that the “and symbol” has an actual name . . . Thanks public school system!

    Reply
  411. Daisy -  September 20, 2012 - 5:01 am

    Looked up ‘solidarity’ – because I gave a friend the definition of it but then wanted to confirm the dictionary official version.

    Reply
  412. Andrew -  September 20, 2012 - 4:55 am

    “Notwithstanding” to make sure I was using it correctly! Also, today a student of mine asked me how to spell “Lamborghini”…

    Reply
  413. Lizzie -  September 20, 2012 - 4:37 am

    I looked up ARDEN because it was in my homework!
    :)

    Reply
  414. Cicimelia -  September 20, 2012 - 3:46 am

    Was at the Eerie county fair a while back and saw a sign for ‘Complementary Seating’. Being from Canada, we wondered if complimentary and complementary were geographic spelling differences. Turns out that they’re not!

    Reply
  415. ilde -  September 20, 2012 - 3:40 am

    I looked up “mentor” to see if it could be used as a noun and a verb, as my hard-cover bilingual dictionary only gives it as a noun.

    Reply
  416. Abdul Malik -  September 20, 2012 - 2:46 am

    looked up for “Genre” to confirm the pronunciation. I betted it on with my colleague.

    Reply
  417. AriesSpirit -  September 20, 2012 - 2:17 am

    Always thought the French for ‘joy of living’ (or life) was ‘joie de vivre’ – yet the hairstylist was called Joie de Vie

    Reply
  418. Cyberquill -  September 20, 2012 - 2:14 am

    I looked up “pamphlet” because I wanted to know if there was any other criterion besides length that separated a pamphlet from a book. What was I doing at the time? Procrastinating. Looking up words is one of the things I tend to do when I actually should be doing something else.

    Reply
  419. Yvette -  September 20, 2012 - 12:52 am

    Sleuth – wasnt sure if it was “e” before “U” or “U” before “e”

    Reply
  420. shanygne davis -  September 20, 2012 - 12:46 am

    Antidisestablishmentarianism

    because my grade 9 teacher dared us to find out what it means because it’s the longest word in the world

    Reply
  421. Matthew -  September 20, 2012 - 12:19 am

    Had a cold yesterday and the tissues I was using had “balsam” written on the packet and so I looked it up to see whether it was any relation to “balsamic” (vinegar).

    Reply
  422. AG -  September 20, 2012 - 12:01 am

    The word “Content”: Wordwebonline pronounces it as “Kuntent”, While all other dictionaries pronounce it is “Kontent” ? which one is right ?

    Reply
  423. Sandra -  September 19, 2012 - 11:59 pm

    Was answering a question posted by Phillip Defranco “one of my favorite ” You tubers about the old paper they found with the words from Jesus stating ” My wife” he asked how do you think it was finished? . I said “My Wife,My Love,My Friend”

    Reply
  424. Johnry -  September 19, 2012 - 11:58 pm

    “Pulchritudinous” because Rebeka and Mary posted it… and I think I’ll post it on my crush’s facebook wall. :)

    Reply
  425. Rik -  September 19, 2012 - 10:06 pm

    Looked up trespass, for pronunciation of pass. I thought I was saying it wrong as -pas but both -puhs and -pas are correct.

    Reply
  426. brian -  September 19, 2012 - 9:34 pm

    in conversation recently, i referred to mitt romney as “stodgy”, and just now, i’ve been watching a british show in which it seemed to be used slightly differently, so i looked it up.

    Reply
  427. Kimberly -  September 19, 2012 - 9:12 pm

    first “ruminate”, then “fetid”, and “posterity”

    Reply
  428. Michael -  September 19, 2012 - 8:27 pm

    Looked up plural of “embryos.” Received a text with that word, thought I’d look up whether it technically should have an “es” on the end, even though the spelling already looked correct. Being a meteorologist, I often see “tornadoes” misspelled (leaving out the “e”).

    Reply
  429. Christina -  September 19, 2012 - 8:25 pm

    I looked up “bicameral” for my college US history class.

    Reply
  430. Jem -  September 19, 2012 - 8:07 pm

    “Leery” Because There is a street called “Leary” And i wasn’t sure if it was a name or an actual word.

    Reply
  431. d -  September 19, 2012 - 7:57 pm

    discombobulating???

    Reply
  432. Adam -  September 19, 2012 - 7:56 pm

    I looked up synthesis because i didnt know what it meant lol

    I LOVE P!NK

    Reply
  433. Allen -  September 19, 2012 - 7:40 pm

    I looked up “Syzygy” just to see what the complete definition was.

    Reply
  434. Archon -  September 19, 2012 - 7:34 pm

    My wife was playing on-line scrabble. She took a chance with “pish”, an expression of derision or dismissal. The computer put an a in front, to create “apish”, which has no connection to pish, but means silly, apelike or imitative, so I looked both of them up. At the same time I looked up ghi, which is the same as ghee, a butterlike substance used in Indian cooking.

    Reply
  435. Byron not the 4:26 Byron -  September 19, 2012 - 7:03 pm

    mackintosh… as in “did not wear a mack in the pouring rain”

    Reply
  436. o_o -  September 19, 2012 - 6:29 pm

    i also looked up pie

    Reply
  437. o_o -  September 19, 2012 - 6:24 pm

    looked up cohesive for school work… im a scrub

    Reply
  438. XxJamberxX -  September 19, 2012 - 6:21 pm

    I looked up “meniscus” because I was remembering terms I learned in Chemistry class.

    Reply
  439. gus petrakis -  September 19, 2012 - 6:12 pm

    I looked up “inflammable” for a mechanic who wanted to know if it was ok to leave this truck inside. I was surprised to learn the the “in” in front of flammable was an intensifying adjective an meant that the contents of this were almost explosive. He parked the truck outside that night.

    Reply
  440. mary -  September 19, 2012 - 6:07 pm

    Pulchritudinous, because Rebeka said it… haha

    Reply
  441. Eli -  September 19, 2012 - 5:56 pm

    I looked up refracted and reflected to see which should be used when considering turbidity.

    Reply
  442. Sabrina -  September 19, 2012 - 5:43 pm

    “Bubo” My husband likes to make up wild stories about how things got their names in attempts to trick me, so when he told me bubonic plague got its name because swollen lymph nodes are called “buboes” I thought it sounded too stupid to be real.

    Reply
  443. Marisa -  September 19, 2012 - 5:41 pm

    Adorned. I was looking for a different word for adorned for an AP English project.

    Reply
  444. meg -  September 19, 2012 - 5:36 pm

    funny pirate jokes

    Reply
  445. Clarence -  September 19, 2012 - 5:35 pm

    I looked up bloviate because I could not find it in my hardbound dictionary. (I read it in Bill O’Reilly’s book Culture War.)

    Reply
  446. yes there is a kalamazoo -  September 19, 2012 - 5:14 pm

    Looked up ‘hybrid vigor’, as i’m attempting to write a sci-fi book by that title. Also looked up ‘pulchritudinous’ from the above comment.

    Reply
  447. Marion -  September 19, 2012 - 5:04 pm

    “Impenetrable” because I was reading a book that was, and I wasn’t sure how to spell it.

    Reply
  448. Deedee -  September 19, 2012 - 5:01 pm

    looked up ‘swanky’ because I was reading about the store Alleykat on a blog and the blog writer called it that. I thought it meant something different but i wasn’t sure, so i looked it up here.

    Reply
  449. michael -  September 19, 2012 - 4:55 pm

    i looked up rollick

    Reply
  450. Jack -  September 19, 2012 - 4:49 pm

    I looked up “ovation” for school work

    Reply
  451. Hansel -  September 19, 2012 - 4:49 pm

    Looked up ‘parlance’

    Reply
  452. luvmonkey -  September 19, 2012 - 4:46 pm

    Concupiscence… to make sure I was spelling it correctly.

    Reply
  453. Erika -  September 19, 2012 - 4:37 pm

    I looked up “potentate” (which means: a person who possesses great power, as a sovereign, monarch, or ruler.)
    because it was spoken of God in a Christian hymn and I didn’t know what it meant. “The potentate of time”, it called Him.

    Reply
  454. Byron -  September 19, 2012 - 4:26 pm

    looked up befuddled

    Reply

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