Dictionary.com

Can you see the difference between those symbols?

Though one of the least-used letters, X has a remarkable way of getting attention. Last year we talked about the varied uses of X: Gen X, Xbox, XOXO, the X chromosome. British dramatist Ben Jonson wanted to remove the 24th letter from the alphabet saying, that x “is rather an abbreviation, or way of short writing, than a letter: for it hath the sound of c and s, or k and s.” With all due respect to Ben Jonson, there’s so much more to X: the fact that the letter and the mathematical symbol × are actually different entities.

Technically, the algebraic symbol × is not identical to the letter x, though they are orthographically related. The difference is subtle; the shape of the letter x is not symmetrical. If you look at it closely, you will see that the top portion above the crossed lines is slightly smaller than the lower portion. Our eyes don’t usually detect it, but this slight variation makes the letter look more stable and more readable.

The mathematical symbol × is two perfectly crossed lines with equal space above and below. When did we start using ×? Arabic mathematicians invented algebra in the 800s. The word algebra came from the Arabic word “al jebr” meaning “reunion of broken parts.” These early mathematicians used the Arabic word šhay’ (which means “thing”) to represent the unknown. When the concepts of algebra reached Spain in the 1000s, the word was particularly hard to pronounce. It makes the “sh” sound which is unusual in Spanish, so Spanish scholars replaced that sound with the Greek chi. In Latin, the Greek chi became the letter x.

For a more detailed explanation, see Terry Moore’s recent video at TED.

Do you use the letter x to represent the unknown? What do you think of this slippery little symbol?

103 Comments

  1. barbi oyunu -  July 12, 2015 - 7:07 am

    perfect first x is larger than the other

    Reply
  2. gebelik hapları isimleri -  July 15, 2014 - 1:00 pm

    You’re right; the x isn’t just an abbreviation as Ben Jonson suggests. Imagine our language without the x!
    e_treme
    e_ceptional
    e_citing
    anthra_
    wa_
    In short, the x had better not go e_tinct.

    Reply
  3. aşk oyunları -  January 25, 2014 - 2:02 pm

    You’re right; the x isn’t just an abbreviation as Ben Jonson suggests. Imagine our language without the x!
    e_treme
    e_ceptional
    e_citing
    anthra_
    wa_
    In short, the x had better not go e_tinct.

    Reply
  4. Xachery -  March 4, 2013 - 7:10 am

    I was in utter outrage at the acknowledgement that some blunder-butt actually concidered ridding the coolest letter from the alphabet! My name has an ‘X’, and I find the letter invigurating. When you see a word with an ‘x’ in it, you automatically are more alerted by the word and are more interested,

    Reply
  5. Kayla -  February 2, 2013 - 1:58 pm

    You’re right; the x isn’t just an abbreviation as Ben Jonson suggests. Imagine our language without the x!
    e_treme
    e_ceptional
    e_citing
    anthra_
    wa_
    In short, the x had better not go e_tinct.

    Reply
  6. Oyun -  December 12, 2012 - 12:18 pm

    Yes i saw it “X”

    Reply
  7. Fatih -  October 31, 2012 - 11:53 am

    Lol, i saw it “X”

    Reply
  8. MK -  October 12, 2012 - 8:58 am

    There’s a difference between ‘thing’ and ‘multiplied by’ in maths. Some use a dot to signify multiplication in lieu of ‘×’ but then you’ve got a dot representing two things as well. We were taught to use distinct looking x’s in keeping with the fact that they are actually two distinct symbols. St. Andrews Cross (×) and a script Roman letter X (

    Reply
  9. Kat S. -  August 6, 2012 - 8:33 pm

    The x is symetrical vertically.

    Reply
  10. Raymond Josh Tula -  June 26, 2012 - 2:50 am

    This is enthrallingly interesting, I’ve learned something today. Thank you for the info.

    Reply
  11. 5@|\/| 7|-|3 @|\|7 -  June 23, 2012 - 12:56 pm

    u dont know what xoxo stand for?

    Reply
  12. mahfooz ahmed khan -  June 22, 2012 - 5:11 am

    FIRST IS ENGLISH ALPHABET “X” AND SECOND IS OBLIQUE PLUS (+)

    Reply
  13. Vinny -  June 20, 2012 - 4:33 am

    What do XOXO stands for?

    Reply
  14. Katie -  June 17, 2012 - 7:49 pm

    x means a kiss to me. ;)

    Reply
  15. mary torres -  June 16, 2012 - 12:50 pm

    i love the way you say ma name lol :)

    Reply
  16. Danna -  June 16, 2012 - 12:27 pm

    You know, in the Polish alphabet there is no X, which is why they write the names Max or Felix as Maks and Feliks. So if they get on alright without X, we can too. But I agree that it shouldn’t be removed just for the fact that it’s not necessary.

    Reply
  17. Cally -  June 15, 2012 - 8:07 am

    Actually, What I noticed about the X versus the + was that The X (which keyboards do not present as smaller in the space above and larger in the space below the two lines(th “v” space) is actually different in another way. (In the picture, though not in this type I am submitting, the X lines do not cross each other perpendicularly as they do in the +. THat is what I first noticed. At any rate… if we did not have X, what would we use? Now it is great for defining X chromosome variations such as XXY or XXX etc. And we could not have the ExXtraordinary Kids Clinic in Denver if we did not have the X. So, I vote to keep it!

    Reply
  18. TETO -  June 14, 2012 - 11:12 pm

    Oh to be 89 again! Then I might stand a chance to be as brilliant as all these babies with their oh so cool comments. I bow to you!

    Reply
  19. Mackenzie -  June 14, 2012 - 12:48 pm

    @gay, (weird username)

    you said,
    i like the way you type

    i say,
    i love the way you lie (no i don’t love it, i’m pretending i’m rihanna)

    Reply
  20. Mackenzie -  June 14, 2012 - 12:47 pm

    When using a computer, and you want to say “multiply” without actually spelling out the words, you should use this button—- ( * ) the asterisk

    instead of x. (because you will get confused if that’s the letter or if that’s the multiplication sign)

    math rocks!!!!!!

    Reply
  21. Hamid Hameed -  June 14, 2012 - 12:14 pm

    X = Beauty

    Reply
  22. ODie -  June 14, 2012 - 4:37 am

    For some unknown reason I tend to use ‘X’ as a shorthand for “trans”, so Xlation instead of translation, say. No idea why…

    Reply
  23. amir46 -  June 13, 2012 - 7:03 pm

    In Arabic the multiplication sign x is pronounced “fee”

    Reply
  24. sam brown -  June 13, 2012 - 1:38 pm

    just kidding

    Reply
  25. Bill Vittitow -  June 13, 2012 - 1:17 pm

    As a trained mathematician I think there was some confusion here.
    An unknown or a known (a constant) can be represented by any letter of any alphebet or even a combination of letters, so when x is an unknown it is a letter. As pointed out in one the the comments the times symbol is an operator and you might say it is different from the letter x.

    Also there are many different fonts. Are the characteristics pointed out of the particular x as written really defining x in all fonts?

    Reply
  26. The Eternal Satyr -  June 13, 2012 - 11:59 am

    I really like how there were so many first-posters and even more people who had nothing intelligent to say. You’d think smarter people would waste their time here at Dictionary.com.

    ::shrug::

    Reply
  27. KathyA -  June 13, 2012 - 11:53 am

    Xs also stand for signatures, also for ‘kisses’ when writing a letter.

    Reply
  28. wondering -  June 13, 2012 - 11:18 am

    Am I still the first post? Because it matters a whole lot!!!

    Reply
  29. James Noone -  June 13, 2012 - 10:28 am

    This is a load of garbage; idiotic writing. It is the contextual use of the symbol X that determines its meaning, not whether or not the angles are equal, etc.

    Over time there have been billions of people writing in countless languages, using the letter X and no two write or wrote X the same. If it looks like X and it’s in a sentence, it’s a letter. If it looks like X and it’s in a mathematical context, it’s a multiplication symbol.

    And the dumbing down of the world continues.

    Reply
  30. majorbedlam -  June 13, 2012 - 10:17 am

    to Mandla Nkosi:

    Howdy. Your name caught my attention. The second word, Nkosi. I seem to remember that word from a fiction novel by Wilbur Smith that I read a long time ago. I think it was meant to be a Zulu word for ‘hyena’. May be showing my ignorance here or at least poor memory. Don’t really know if ‘Zulu’ is used for the name of the language spoken by the people. Anyway, a very cool name. No reference to the critter’s reputation. Just sparked an old dusty memory.

    Uhuru,
    Majorbedlam

    Reply
  31. Not first comment -  June 13, 2012 - 9:04 am

    How many people wrote that they were the first comment and were not . . . they should be x’d. Another meaning for x . . .

    Reply
  32. fabgirl -  June 13, 2012 - 7:32 am

    cyberquill really good question

    Reply
  33. fabgirl -  June 13, 2012 - 7:30 am

    It is odd how X can mean delete, but in math it means times and the unknown.

    Reply
  34. Ali Ebrahimi -  June 13, 2012 - 7:29 am

    The text seems a little confusing. The algebraic symbol mentioned with its history is the unknown symbol while the cross symbol in the illustration is what used here and there for multiplication.

    Reply
  35. Jacky -  June 13, 2012 - 3:28 am

    This is soooooo cool… even though i can’t actually tell what the difference is!
    :(

    Reply
  36. Joseph Willenbrink -  June 13, 2012 - 3:17 am

    To Cyberquill and all -

    If x represents the unknown, usually “c” is used to represent a known. “C” is for “constant”, although the known is different for any new equation. For example, Enstein’s famous E=mc^2 . Here the “c” represents the speed of light. When equations have two unknowns, the second unknown is usually represented by “y”. If there is a second constant, the letter “k” is often used, psooibly due to the similar sound to a hard “c”, and possibly due to the letter’s resemblance to the letter “x”.

    Reply
  37. prash -  June 13, 2012 - 1:56 am

    what d heck…, nothing inp., nthng knowledgeable out in this.

    Reply
  38. NK Ali -  June 13, 2012 - 12:27 am

    Thanx a million for giving us Muslims the credit of inventing “Algebra.” Although, not very fond of it in school, I managed to get thru quite well. The small differences mentioned are indeed very interesting.
    Thanx again for saying something good about us, albeit being a Muslim is considered a disadvantage in today’s West.
    There is a lot more and Dictionary.com can certainly surprise its members and visitors. Give it a try sometime.
    Salams (this visitor hits your website on a daily basis).

    Reply
  39. marka eppi -  June 13, 2012 - 12:02 am

    How delayed are the comments if so many people claimed first post/comment and so many people thought that they were replying first straight after Noen N. Particular’s x-mas question? Apologies to Ollie and John M. Długosz for my third repition of the x-mas story :)

    Reply
  40. eric fletcher -  June 12, 2012 - 11:46 pm

    interesting one…

    Reply
  41. Billy-goat -  June 12, 2012 - 8:37 pm

    Masterful little X is indeed a useful letter and symbol. Used to represent the unknown in Algebra. Used in abbreviated words such as Xmas, Xmission and Xformer. Used in some of my favorite words such as foxy, sexy and of course the wondrous acronym (?) XXX!!! The world would not be the same with the lovely letter X!

    Reply
  42. yayRayShell -  June 12, 2012 - 6:56 pm

    This is the most ultimate article ever! :D I love all these articles talking about little mysteries in the world and why we have them. I’ve always wondered why x was used as a multiplication symbol and as a variable if they would be so easily confused. I never noticed the difference in the line sizes of the letter x.

    I typically use x as a variable because it is often seen in books and the common practice and I can easily recognize it as a common variable when practicing algebra instead of some random number.

    Reply
  43. RuneScape -  June 12, 2012 - 6:47 pm

    simple

    Reply
  44. RuneScape -  June 12, 2012 - 6:46 pm

    To Yankiemog
    The cork costs .25 cents
    Bottle costs 2.25 cents
    2.25-.25=2
    2.25+.25=2.5
    I’m in 1st grade

    Reply
  45. anonxmus -  June 12, 2012 - 6:39 pm

    XD

    Reply
  46. aPastafarian -  June 12, 2012 - 5:53 pm

    All my X’s live in Text’s

    Reply
  47. Bob Dole -  June 12, 2012 - 4:50 pm

    @Cyberquill

    Nothing represents the “known” variables since we already know the value of those variables (e.g. in x = 1 + 2, x is the unknown variable while 1 and 2 are the variables that we know the value of).

    Reply
  48. Hannah G. Lee -  June 12, 2012 - 4:16 pm

    Ann, I totally agree with you and by the way, I WAS GOING TO SAY THAT!!! But, we are sisters anyways and we usually think the same. So, where were we?? Oh, another obvious difference is that × is smaller and is raised a little higher than this x. Also, the angles on × are different than the angles on x meaning that all angles of × are approximately 90° angles and x has obtuse angles on the left and right and acute on top and bottom. BET YOU FORGOT TO PUT THAT! Mrs. Georgi is going to be so disappointed when I tell her this (meaning what you forgot to put).

    Usually, I don’t comment in dictionary.com but I caught you this time!!
    I was telling Katie Peterson to “patrol” the “dictionary” but recently she has been busy (FOR THE FIRST TIME!) because she has improved a lot in swim and now she has to swim like 4 hours per day.
    BOOHOO! :(
    But don’t worry she will come back in the summer when school is out and she has more time.

    Reply
  49. John -  June 12, 2012 - 4:14 pm

    I agree with Ben Johnson’s sound logic. The author of this article, Hot Word, is hanging onto a melting anchor with an extremely slippery slope beneath his or her feet. No attack intended, but whole-heartedly agree with Ben Johnson. Through my lens, I think x or X is better used as a symbol verses a letter. Ben’s suggestion leads me to believe that his intent is to simplify the English language. I grew up in an region where butchering the English language word annunciation was the norm and eliminating x or X word have helped an ignorant kid such as myself.to better learn proper English. Good article and I appreciate the post from all others.

    Reply
  50. William -  June 12, 2012 - 4:12 pm

    We have already lost a planet. There is no need to also lose a letter.

    Reply
  51. Dieter -  June 12, 2012 - 4:07 pm

    Replace X by ks or cs? What sense would that make? We already have words such as “eccentric” that are pronounced like “eksentric” or “exentric” but that is for historical or etymological reasons. Why would we want to create new problems in our language? Should we not learn from German “sechs” which is actually pronounced “sex” and means “six” in English?
    No, give me “luxury”, “mixing”, “sex” even if we are suffering from “taxes”. What would we do without our XXX for “kisses”?

    Reply
  52. fostek -  June 12, 2012 - 3:35 pm

    @Kent… It should be Xian if one follows the replacement structure.

    Reply
  53. Bubba -  June 12, 2012 - 3:28 pm

    Wouldn’t it be cool to have this website employ its word recognition program to identify anything like “Yay! I’m the first to post.”, and then have them automaticaly relegated to the bottom of the pile. Did any of you children notice that NONE of you actually made it? You did? Good. Go die.
    Insofar as ECKs vs EX, it seems to depend on which typeface one happens to be using. In this case (upper or lower) both are entirely identical. Interesting article.

    Reply
  54. J J Rousseau -  June 12, 2012 - 3:05 pm

    First with a factor of YDX, Oui, not that complex.

    Reply
  55. Him Higgins -  June 12, 2012 - 1:20 pm

    X.. Such a cool letter.. Commonly used to keep information discreet. For example a social security #, instead of writing the whole number out companies tend to use five x’s and the last four digits. Where would be without this amazing letter. What would “X-Men” be called. Z-Men.. uh.. NO!!!!

    Reply
  56. Andrew B -  June 12, 2012 - 1:19 pm

    One advantage of having two symbols is that it allows you to use ‘x’ as a mathematical variable and still use ‘×’ for multiplication (rather than ‘•’ or something similar):

    x × y = xy
    x × x = x²
    etc.

    Reply
  57. random person -  June 12, 2012 - 1:14 pm

    When someone says “XOXOXO” to me, I feel nothing. I really like doing algebra. It actually makes sense to me. Also, the letter X is the coolest in the alphabet. Xbox 360, X-ray, and xenon.

    Reply
  58. Judy Kirby -  June 12, 2012 - 12:48 pm

    one x is larger than the other….the one on my left

    Reply
  59. Juan Manuel -  June 12, 2012 - 12:33 pm

    Responding to Cyberquill…
    The known is usually represented by the first letters, i. e.: a, b, c,…

    Reply
  60. lozza -  June 12, 2012 - 12:32 pm

    xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx!!!!! x)

    Reply
  61. klem39 -  June 12, 2012 - 12:27 pm

    Seems tobe popular in Chinese to English versions of their names. Why so?

    Reply
  62. Ann lee -  June 12, 2012 - 11:56 am

    The slightly bigger top space is not what makes the letter x so different from the multiplication symbol. It’s that the lines are crossed differently in each. All the angles in the math symbol are ninety degrees. Turn it 45 degrees and you will see. The angles in the letter x obviously are not equal. That’s the difference.

    Reply
  63. Kent -  June 12, 2012 - 9:51 am

    Okay, let us change the “Christmas” to “Xmas” and the name “Christian” to “Xtian” brilliant :)

    Reply
  64. No Reason.... (Shane) -  June 12, 2012 - 9:50 am

    Woot.. first one to Post. (Not) why do people say stuff like that. get to the topic.

    Avast, me hearties!

    X was used by pirates too. X marks the spot.

    Aye!

    Reply
  65. marka eppi -  June 12, 2012 - 9:13 am

    The reason Christmas is abbreviated as X-mas is because the x (Greek letter chi, equivalent of the Latin letters ‘ch’) is the initial letter in the Greek version of Christ = Χριστoς (Christos), hence the shortening of our Saviour’s birth celebration to x-mas

    Reply
  66. Heidi Drew -  June 12, 2012 - 8:35 am

    I recently wrote and performed a monologue titled, “B person” in which “X” was a supporting member of the cast of convictions. It’s role was a grade given by an art teacher for “excellent expression. Check marks were for job completed…” X is a wonderful mark and aren’t all our letters really just symbols? Why would anyone want to eliminate such a brilliant symbol in any of it’s uses?

    Reply
  67. Fay -  June 12, 2012 - 8:17 am

    Fun to exxxagerate! Like your comments, Thomas…

    Reply
  68. Ollie -  June 12, 2012 - 7:47 am

    In response to Neon N. Particular, I found the following written on Wikipedia with regards to the usage of the term Xmas:

    The “-mas” part is from the Latin-derived Old English word for “Mass”, while the “X” comes from the Greek letter Chi, which is the first letter of the Greek word Χριστός, translated as “Christ”.

    So it would appear that the term Xmas is as significant as Christmas.

    Reply
  69. Dikshunairee.kom -  June 12, 2012 - 7:05 am

    Did anyone else notice how in the comments there are about four or five people who claim that they posted first? lol…….

    Reply
  70. ALGEBRAX | BLOGCHI@mayopia.com -  June 12, 2012 - 6:55 am

    [...] ‘Algebrax’ unrelated to facts — The most interesting Man in the World — Mathematically, Thematically, alphabetically — How would we have sex without the X or chromosome, — tactically speaking, — the Y is simply context. — And most Beerfully we remain perplexed. –>>L.T.Rhyme [...]

    Reply
  71. Vixx Secundus -  June 12, 2012 - 6:11 am

    I’m a big fan of X. I use two in my name!

    Reply
  72. Chris -  June 12, 2012 - 5:33 am

    The letter X is still symmetrical; it’s symmetrical on the vertical axis rather than the horizonal axis (and, truth be told, I’d venture to say that most people mean vertical-axis symmetry when they talk about whether something is symmetrical).

    Also, I haven’t used the algabraeic symbol “x” in math since, probably, the 4th or 5th grade, if that. Since one often uses letters in algabra to represent variables, “x” can be confusing in an equation. Instead, most students are taught to indicate multiplication is to take place by using the a dot, like a period but raised well above the bottom of the line. Alternatively, multiplication is represented by having numbers/variables adjacent to each other. For example, y=mx+b doesn’t mean m times plus b, which makes no sense. “x” is a variable, not a sign. Multiplication is represented by the variables “m” and “x” being directly adjacent to one another.

    Reply
  73. Mandla Nkosi -  June 12, 2012 - 5:32 am

    its really difficult to solve x hey!

    Reply
  74. John M. Długosz -  June 12, 2012 - 2:04 am

    I think the article is confused. It explains the reason we use the letter x for an unknown; it is properly typeset in math as an italic letter. The symbol on the right is the multiplication sign, whose origin is not explained.

    As for “X-mas”, Noen, that is actually a Greek ‘χ’ (chi) which is the correct abbreviation for Christ (that is, “Χριστός”). In English it becomes the hard “ch” consonant.

    Reply
  75. anonymous -  June 12, 2012 - 1:45 am

    That is so cool!

    Reply
  76. Yankiemog -  June 12, 2012 - 12:46 am

    If a bottle and a cork cost two and a half cents and the bottle cost two cents more than the cork how much does the cork cost? Get your al jebr out and find the answer.

    Reply
  77. Reem I. Alabed -  June 12, 2012 - 12:18 am

    Thomas – I don’t whether you were trying to be funny but you just made my night. That was hilarious =D

    As for the removing of the letter… please don’t. My little sister is so content that she knows her ABC’s. If I tell her that someone decided to omit an alphabet she may go crazy.

    Reply
  78. Jay -  June 11, 2012 - 10:12 pm

    To Shrapnel:

    Actually the author is correct. He wasn’t referring to the x that you were referring to. He was talking about the other one and when you look closely, the edges are not straight, but rather slanted…hence making it asymmetrical.

    Reply
  79. Noen N. Particular -  June 11, 2012 - 9:07 pm

    Cool, I’m the first one to post.

    I usually make it a point not to shorten my words by replacing certain sounds or syllables with “x”. In the case of replacing “deer crossing” with “deer x-ing”, that makes sense because you need to conserve space on the road sign, but there is absolutely no reason to replace “Christmas” with “x-mas”.
    The only time I use the letter x to represent the unknown is when I’m doing algebra and calculus (usually in concordance with y, z, and other variables).

    Reply
  80. Rexas -  June 11, 2012 - 8:36 pm

    The mathematical symbol seems to be two intersecting rectangles while the letter X consist of two intersecting parallelograms in the thumbnail provided. It makes you wonder…

    Reply
  81. Patricia -  June 11, 2012 - 8:13 pm

    There is another difference between those symbols. The shapes of the ends of the lines are different. One is diagonal to the line, and the other is at a right angle to the line.

    Reply
  82. Paul -  June 11, 2012 - 7:59 pm

    So this explains why we use “X” as a variable or an unknown quantity in algebra, but not why a slightly variant version of the letter came to be the mathematical symbol for multiplication. One would think if the Greek letter chi being translated into Latin as the letter X was the reason, entasis would cause the mathematical symbol to be ever so slightly smaller at the top than the bottom to give the illusion of symmetry.

    Reply
  83. Richard -  June 11, 2012 - 7:26 pm

    xXx

    Reply
  84. Thomas -  June 11, 2012 - 7:23 pm

    “X” marks the spot BEN JONSON. Now why on Earth do you have a grudge against the letter x? Does it remind you of your ex? Or exs? Maybe you just want to write the word ecsample instead. Because hey, that looks like the correct way of spelling it then we can say ph sounds like f so rewrite all the ph words. Lets take the letter e off of more since it is written moron instead of moreon or does simply more on mean something else? How about if your name is Max it is now Ma because some guy named Ben said so.

    Reply
  85. Emshemie -  June 11, 2012 - 6:19 pm

    what? life just got more complicated…..

    Reply
  86. Donovan S. Lealuga -  June 11, 2012 - 5:48 pm

    The difference between the two x’s is that one, it’s sideways and two, the other one is perfectly straighten out. It’s actually is a common difference.

    Reply
  87. Iyre -  June 11, 2012 - 5:23 pm

    X is a good letter of the alphabet. I don’t want it removed.

    Reply
  88. Taylor -  June 11, 2012 - 4:04 pm

    First comment! This is interesting

    Reply
  89. 2nd -  June 11, 2012 - 3:54 pm

    I use it to say stuff in a code. Xxxxxxxx xx xx xxxxx xxxxxx.

    Reply
  90. Cyberquill -  June 11, 2012 - 3:37 pm

    If x represents the unknown, then what letter represents the known?

    Reply
  91. Shrapnel -  June 11, 2012 - 2:49 pm

    I find it funny that the author of this article said that the letter ‘x’ isn’t symmetrical, because it is. The top may not be symmetrical to the bottom, but the left is symmetrical to the right (it exhibits bilateral symmetry). I think the term the author was looking for was “radially symmetrical” because that would be correct. The letter ‘x’ lacks radial symmetry (a circle has radial symmetry).

    Reply
  92. gay -  June 11, 2012 - 2:26 pm

    i like the way u type :D

    Reply
  93. HuBBaBuBBa -  June 11, 2012 - 2:17 pm

    i know!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    X and the multiplication sign is different. the multiplication sign is squatter and if you connect the vertices of the multiplication sign, it’s a square, but X won’t make a square, it’ll make a rectangle.

    Reply
  94. HuBBaBuBBa -  June 11, 2012 - 2:13 pm

    yay, I i’m the first one to comment this.

    Reply
  95. Vanessa C -  June 11, 2012 - 1:55 pm

    I think the letter X is amazing in all ways used. It is math that intrigues me the most. But when someone sends me xoxoxox I feel adoration and it leaves me smiling. X used in words as always made me wonder what more could this strange letter represent and now I have a bit more information to add to what I had already known. Thanks

    Reply
  96. GryffindorGirl -  June 11, 2012 - 1:51 pm

    This is absolutely brilliant!

    Reply

Leave A Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked (required):

Related articles

Back to Top